Category: wbsxgeld

Canadian universities sign off on pledge to greater diversity accessibility

first_imgOTTAWA – Canadian universities have done a great job making their campuses more accessible for students with disabilities, but now have to turn more attention to helping those students get jobs, one of Canada’s leading disability advocates told a room full of university presidents Wednesday.Rick Hansen, a former paralympian whose foundation is devoted to making the world a more accessible place, spoke to the presidents in Ottawa on Wednesday, just before they voted to make a public commitment to seven principles of diversity.Presidents of about 60 schools that are members of Universities Canada voted to adopt the principles which include a commitment to identify and remove barriers for women, visible minorities, Indigenous peoples and people with disabilities when it comes to university hiring practices, leadership roles and the student body.Dawn Russell, president of St. Thomas University in Fredericton and a board member of Universities Canada, said that includes conducting surveys of member schools to collect data on how universities are currently doing on diversity issues and setting benchmarks that will be updated and reported on regularly.Data on diversity on Canadian campuses is limited, with many schools choosing not to collect data at all on the gender or race of their students and employees.Hansen said universities are one of the best places to take the lead on making Canada a country where accommodating disabilities is not just seen as the charitable thing to do but as an initiative with massive economic and social benefits.He said universities have done a lot of work to help admit and ensure students with disabilities graduate, but they can now step that effort up with help to give those students jobs.“One of the great successes of universities is that a lot of young students with disabilities are graduating from universities but these students have a 50 per cent unemployment rate, which is significantly different than their able-bodied counterparts,” Hansen said in an interview.“So universities can turn their attention to the very students that they’re actually educating and see them as potential employees, faculty or staff members. That’s a big opportunity.”Hansen said universities can also ensure barriers are removed for employees as the workforce ages, can include accessibility in the curriculum in programs like architecture and engineering and can prioritize research on social policy and technical innovations “that can change the world for people with disabilities and drive new economies people couldn’t have imagined before.”Russell said one of the ways her university has attempted to break down barriers to employment for people from disadvantaged or under-represented groups is to ensure a member of their equity committee is part of every faculty hiring process. Other schools require hiring committees to show how many candidates from under-represented groups were interviewed and if they weren’t hired, to say why someone not from one of those groups had the better qualifications.Earlier this year Science Minister Kirsty Duncan laid down an edict that universities had two years to show progress at recruiting more researchers from under-represented groups when awarding federally funded research grants, or risk losing their grants.Russell said that edict was one of several “strands” that led to the decision to write and vote on the seven principles.“It’s an important milestone,” Russell said. “It’s recognizing Canada is a country that prides itself on multiculturalism and openness to diversity and equity and we need to operationalize that in our universities to really make sure that Canada is a land of equal opportunity.”— follow @mrabson on Twitter.last_img read more

Experienced UN official to head peacebuilding office in Central African Republic

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today announced the appointment of Margaret Vogt of Nigeria as his Special Representative and head of the United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in the Central African Republic (BINUCA). Ms. Vogt, currently Deputy Director of the Africa I Division in the Department of Political Affairs (DPA), and a former deputy special representative in Somalia, will replace Sahle-Work Zewde at BINUCA. During her career Ms. Vogt has also worked with the African Union (AU) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). The UN withdrew its peacekeeping operation from the Central African Republic (CAR) and Chad last year at the end of its mandate, and has since concentrated on civilian peacebuilding efforts, including promoting reconciliation, supporting the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration process, electoral assistance, reforming the security sector and helping efforts to restore State authority throughout the country. The Security Council has extended the mandate of BINUCA until 31 December. 19 May 2011Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today announced the appointment of Margaret Vogt of Nigeria as his Special Representative and head of the United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in the Central African Republic (BINUCA). read more

Global steps vital to preserve worldwide soil fertility and avoid famine UN

“Soil is an essential component of the world’s production systems and ecosystems,” UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Director-General Jacques Diouf said, calling for a renewed international effort to assure sufficient fertile and healthy soils today and for future generations.“But it is also a fragile and non-renewable resource. It is very easily degraded and it is slow, difficult and expensive to regenerate,” he told the opening session of a three-day meeting in Rome to launch a new Global Soil Partnership for Food security and Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation.Competing land uses and extensive degradation are rapidly depleting the amounts of soils and water available for food production. In Africa alone 6.3 million hectares of degraded farmland have lost their fertility and water-holding capacity and need to be regenerated to meet the demand for food of a population set to more than double in the next 40 years, FAO stressed. In 1982 the agency adopted a World Soil Charter spelling out the basic principles and guidelines for sustainable soil management and soil protection to be followed by governments and international organizations.“However, there have been long delays in applying the Charter in many countries and regions of the world. New efforts to implement it must be made as soon as possible,” Mr. Diouf said. Besides helping implement provisions of the World Soil Charter, the Global Soil Partnership is intended to motivate action by decision-makers on the importance of soils for food security and climate change adaptation and mitigation, provide technical solutions for soil protection and management and mobilize resources and expertise for joint activities and programmes.The Partnership will complement the 15-year-old Global Water Partnership launched by the UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the World Bank in 1996 to coordinate the development and management of water, land, and related resources to maximize economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of vital environmental systems. Short-term interventions to provide food, water and basic needs such as seeds and fertilizer to enhance agriculture is the usual response to food crises and extreme weather such as the current drought and famine in the Horn of Africa, particularly Somalia, but longer-term, large-scale measures are needed to build greater resilience to degradation, drought and climate change and reduce human vulnerability to disasters, FAO noted. 7 September 2011Pressures on the world’s limited amounts of soils available for agriculture together with land degradation are threatening global food security and imperiling long-tem efforts to avoid widespread famine, a senior United Nations official warned today. read more

UK men jailed for attacking Sinhalese man

Harrow Crown Court heard the victim was approached by the pair in Wembley High Road and told he must apologise to them. The victim sustained serious injuries and will be scarred for life.Both men, who were arrested near the scene, had denied wounding intent but were found guilty yesterday.Lazarus has been jailed for eight years and Sinneveham for seven. When he tried to explain he did not know what he was apologising for and that he was not in the army he was attacked by the pair. Detective Constable Cyntac Wong from Brent Police, said: “This offence involved a brutal, unprovoked attack on a man simply because he was Sinhalese. While trying to escape he was dragged across the busy thoroughfare where they carried on their vicious assault in front of shocked bystanders.Witnesses who tried to intervene were told by Lazarus that it was “nothing to do with them”. Two Tamil men in Britain have been jailed for a brutal unprovoked attack on a man in Wembley who was targeted because he was Sinhalese, the Kilburn Times reported.Angelo Lazarus, 30, of Northwick Road, and Sathulinga Sinneveham, 32, of Pasture Road, punched, kicked and beat their victim with a broken bottle on February 12 last year. “His injuries were serious and his scars will be a permanent reminder. The sentences reflect the severity of the assault and the fact that racist attacks will not be tolerated.“This would not have been possible without the quick thinking of witnesses who called us and the quick response of our officers.” read more

In Kosovo senior UN peacekeeping official urges reconciliation

Jean-Marie Guéhenno met with a number of officials and toured various sites, including the “returns village” in Suvi Lukavac, where he said that when displaced people went back to their homes they served as a positive example for others.“We want more people to come back,” he told reporters. “I think it is possible but it needs real willingness and [a] change of hearts and minds.”Responding to a question, he stressed that security and economic development are essential to spur the returns process on. Earlier in Mitrovica, he told the press that he had seen significant changes in the security situation in the area since his last visit in 2000. At the same time, he noted the need for greater economic activity, saying this “comes with trust.” read more

Senior United Nations officials Security Council condemn attack on Somali parliament

“There can be no justification for such attacks,” Mr. Ban said in a statement from his spokesperson.He convoyed his solidarity and support for the lawmakers “who represent the people of Somalia and their aspirations for a peaceful future”. Mr. Kay, who heads the UN Assistance Mission, (UNSOM) in the country, said separately that the UN will continue to support the Somali people and their Government as they work towards “peace and stability” in the Horn of Africa nation.Earlier in the day, he had spoken with Prime Minister Abdiweli Sheikh Ahmed to express his solidarity and sincere condolences to the families and friends of those who suffered in the attack and wished a swift recovery for those injured.The 15-member Security Council also underlined its support for the Somali Federal Government, and all actors working towards greater peace and stability in Somalia, following the attack. “They reiterated that this and other senseless acts of terrorism would not diminish that support,” according to a statement disseminated to the press. The Council, along with Mr. Ban and Mr. Kay, also commended the “prompt action” by Somali National Forces and African Union peacekeeping forces (AMISOM) to stop the attack. Al-Shabaab insurgents have since claimed responsibility. At least six attackers and one of the soldiers fighting them were killed, according to media reports. In April, Al-Shabaab claimed responsibility for killing two parliamentarians in Mogadishu in less than 48 hours. Earlier this week, Mr. Kay told the UN Security Council in a video-conference from the capital city that despite political, economic and security progress in the last 12 months, the country was approaching a “danger zone” in a number of areas, including insecurity. read more

Week In Westminster – Week ending Friday 15 February 2013

DOWNLOAD1. Mayor announces plans for an Ultra Low Emissions Zone in central London2. Westminster Hall debate on Manufacturing in the East Midlands held3. MPs debate engineering careers4. Week aheadClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)

Support dont obsess when Ohio State takes the field this year

There’s a certain time in every sports fan’s life where it’s time to grow up. The time when it’s okay to throw away the face-paint, time to put the jerseys back on their hangers, time to just, you know, tone it down a bit. Don’t take that for something it’s not, though: sports are a nearly universal thing that brings out the 12-year-old in all of us. It’s easy to understand why they mean so much to us. For so many people, sports are just something to believe in, something they can proudly support on their hat and be reassured it’s a steady foundation to hang that hat on. Your sports team might let you down once in a while, but it will always try to make it up to you. Really, it will. Sports aren’t turning on the television for a couple hours on a Saturday. They aren’t a casual way to blow back a Sunday evening. While what sports means to you is entirely contextual, the bigger picture suggests that sports, for the most crazed fans, are more of a religion than a hobby. And for what that’s worth, it’s incredible – and incredibly scary. If there’s a line in the sand between passion and obsession it’s wire-thin. Why do we care? Not that I can speak for them, but when Ohio State’s football team runs out of the faded red tunnel on Sept. 1 against Miami University (Ohio), understand that they need your support, not your blood. Anything more is a recipe to create and feed a beast that’s already had enough to eat. Understand that the Braxton Millers, the John Simons, the Jordan Halls of the world are students – 18 to 22-year-old kids who have classes to go to, life to attend to, girlfriends to deal with. They wake up the way you do, breathe the way you do, feel the way you do. Understand that regardless of how brilliant they are in the Horseshoe on Saturday afternoons, they might not necessarily be someone you would want to associate yourself with at Big Bar later that night. Exceptional football ability doesn’t always translate to exceptional character off the field, no matter how much some folks would argue otherwise. It could, though, and they might be someone truly worth bestowing your affection upon – John Simon, for instance, is someone I’d love to have a beer with. But I won’t be tatting his name on my buttocks or naming my first-born after him. The point? Understand that the idolatry, the hero worship, the glorification, the can-do-no-wrong, “holier than thou” treatment of the team – players to coaches – is misguided and can be dangerous. These guys, these players – blessed with more athletic ability than I could ever fathom – are amazingly talented athletes who are often the people off the field we sometimes try to mentally conjure them to be. Sometimes, they’re not and to think otherwise is naïve and blissfully ignorant. Admiration, respect and maybe even envy for the outstanding athletic gifts they possess are beyond warranted, as is praise for the great things behind the scenes like visiting hospitals with devastatingly sick children or reading to a group of underprivileged inner city kids. The balance here is clearing off the Scarlet and Gray lenses and being able to rid yourself of a schema that views these guys as gods around Columbus. The balance is understanding that while athletes, especially those at OSU, are role models, not all of them deserve to be. Be careful: Your Harvey Dent on the field might be Two-Face off of it. read more

Having blood type O almost trebles risk of dying from serious injury

Having blood type O almost trebles the risk of dying from serious injury because it does not clot as well, scientists have found. Data from 901 emergency care patients in Japan showed a death rate of 28 per cent for those with type O blood.The death rate of patients from other blood groups combined was 11 per cent.Lead researcher Dr Wataru Takayama, from Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital, said: “Recent studies suggest that blood type O could be a potential risk factor for haemorrhage.”Loss of blood is the leading cause of death in patients with severe trauma but studies on the association between different blood types and the risk of trauma death have been scarce.”We wanted to test the hypothesis that trauma survival is affected by differences in blood types.” Forty-seven per cent of the UK population are type O, making it the most common blood group.Blood type is determined by proteins on the surfaces of red blood cells. The other main blood group categories are A, B and AB.Forty-two per cent of the population are type A, 8 per cent type B and 3 per cent type AB. Type O blood can generally be donated to anyone with no ill-effects, whereas someone with type A blood can only donate to someone who is type A or type AB, someone with type B blood can only donate to someone who is type B or type AB and someone with type AB blood can only donate to someone who is type AB. Serious trauma patients with type O blood were more likely to die than those with other types of blood, researchers foundCredit:Peter Dazeley However, people with type O blood have lower levels of Von Willebrand factor, a blood clotting agent that may help prevent life-threatening bleeding. The researchers suggest that a lower level of the factor is a possible explanation for the higher death rate in trauma patients with blood type O.Dr Takayama said the results raised questions about the emergency transfusion of type O red blood cells to severe trauma patients – victims of injuries with the potential to cause long-term disability or death.He said: “Our results also raise questions about how emergency transfusion of O type red blood cells to a severe trauma patient could affect haemostasis, the process which causes bleeding to stop, and if this is different from other blood types.”Further research is necessary to investigate the results of our study and develop the best treatment strategy for severe trauma patients.”All the study participants had suffered severe trauma and been admitted to critical care medical centres in Japan between 2013 and 2016.The researchers cautioned that all the patients whose data was analysed in this study were Japanese, so there is need for further research to understand if the findings apply to other ethnic groups. Doctor/ Nurse holding blood bag. Show more Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The research is reported in the journal Critical Care. read more

Hello sunshine Astronaut snaps cloudless Dublin from ISS

first_imgSource: @astro_lucaMOVE OVER COMMANDER Hadfield, there’s a new astronaut in town.And by ‘town’ we mean ‘on the International Space Station’, and by ‘move over’ we mean ‘there will always be a place for you in our hearts’.Anyway: Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano is currently orbiting our planet on the ISS, and he sent his greetings to Ireland via this photo of a sun-drenched Dublin.He evidently understands Irish weather too. “I had to wait but it was worth it.”How astronauts wash their hair in space (GIFs)>Chris Hadfield’s replacements to study plants and fire in space>last_img read more

SPOILERS 915 WWE NXT TV taping results from Full Sail University Former

first_img Adam Martin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 3 COMMENTS I like to imagine Samoa Joe pretending to be a doctor/rn to get Shinsuke’s medical records. WhatsApp Pinterest Shinsuke Nakamura Will Reportedly Return From His Dog Bite Injury Soon Ucraina: test anti-droga per i candidati alla presidenza Now Playing Up Next So Sanity is a faction that includes Eric Young. I predict that the Authors of Pain will win the Dusty Rhodes Tag Team Classic. Miz and Mrs. Season One coming to the WWE Network Friday, September 20 WWE Announces Rey Mysterio Match For SmackDown 1000 Google+ Now Playing Up Next goddessroleplay Now Playing Up Next Comments are closed. September 16, 2016 at 11:31 am Shinsuke Nakamura The following was taped on Thursday night at Full Sail University.Dark match:* Jack Gallagher def. Noam Dar.9/15 WWE NXT TV taping results:* Samoa Joe cut a promo saying he has Shinsuke Nakamura’s medical report and it says Nakamura is out 6-12 weeks. He wants to either face Nakamura or have him stripped of the title. William Regal came out and said he will handle the situation Joe created.* Austin Aries def. Oney Lorcan.* Billie Kay def. Aliyah.* Cedric Alexander def. Andrade “Cien” Almas.* William Regal announced the return of the Dusty Rhodes Tag Team Classic. The tournament will conclude at NXT TakeOver: Toronto.* Tye Dillinger def. Angelo Dawkins. After the match, Bobby Roode tells Dillinger he needs a perfect partner to win the Dusty Classic.* The Revival vs. The Ealy Brothers never took place as Samoa Joe attacked both Ealy Brothers and The Revival watched from the ramp. Joe tells Regal to bring him Nakamura or he will continue destroying people.* The Authors of Pain def. two local talents.* Asuka def. Liv Morgan.* Hideo Itami def. Lince Dorado.* The Authors of Pain def. The Bollywood Boyz in a Dusty Rhodes Tag Team Classic tournament match.* Rich Swann def. Patrick Clark.* Peyton Royce def. Danielle Kamela.* Dan Matha was about to make his debut when Samoa Joe attacked him. Joe demanded that Regal hand him the title next week.* NXT Tag Team Champions The Revival def. Andrade “Cien” Almas and Cedric Alexander in a Dusty Rhodes Tag Team Classic tournament match.* Sanity (Sawyer Fulton and Alexander Wolfe) with Eric Young and Nikki Cross def. Tye Dillinger and Bobby ROode in a Dusty Rhodes Tag Team Classic tournament match. Roode never took off his robe and allowed Dillinger to get attacked. Young and Cross revealed themselves after the match.* Billie Kay def. Liv Morgan.* TM61 def. Riddick Moss and Tino Sabbatelli in a Dusty Rhodes Tag Team Classic tournament match.* Blake vs. Murphy went to a no contest when Samoa Joe attacked them both. Joe called out Nakamura and Nakamura appeared in a neckbrace. Nakamura removed it and got into a brawl with Joe.Source: The Wrestling Observer/Figure Four OnlineRecommended videosPowered by AnyClipRumored Plans For Rey Mysterio Upon WWE ReturnVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPauseUnmuteDuration 0:26/Current Time 0:04Loaded: 100.00%0:04Remaining Time -0:22 FullscreenUp NextThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Replay the list Rumored Plans For Rey Mysterio Upon WWE Return Why not, it worked for Dr. Gallows and Dr. Anderson on Raw a few times so I could see Dr. Joe getting Shinsuke’s medical records! WWE seems to take tough guys and make fools of them on TV so why not make it Joe’s turn? WWE and Full Sail University announce expanded partnership for NXT Television Now Playing Up Next unknown Videos Articles September 16, 2016 at 8:59 am Now Playing Up Next WWE NXT Results – 9/11/19 (Last episode before the USA Network move, Ripley vs. Baszler) Twitter Peter Dolly Facebook Dark Phoenix: Temptation September 17, 2016 at 5:35 amlast_img read more

Administration Takes Exception to Defense Bills Attempt to Disband Support Agencies

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The White House opposes several of the reforms in the House’s fiscal 2019 defense authorization bill intended to streamline Pentagon bureaucracy, including language that would eliminate the Washington Headquarters Services and reorganize the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). Overall, the Statement of Administration Policy issued by the Office of Management and Budget on Tuesday supports H.R. 5515, while objecting to about 40 individual provisions.Rather than eliminating the Washington Headquarters Services, the White House urges lawmakers to include it in the review the legislation calls for of defense agencies and field activities. That review would be carried out by the Pentagon’s chief management officer (CMO) and assess the efficiency and effectiveness of DOD support activities while looking for potential duplication. The bill directs the CMO to report to Congress on any recommendations to eliminate an agency or activity, or transfer some or all of its functions to another department entity.Transferring all information technology contracting, acquisition, and senior leader communication services from DISA to other DOD elements “would increase the cost of acquiring information technology, weaken the department’s ability to secure its cyber networks, and inhibit DISA’s mission to provide seamless communication to warfighters and senior leaders,” according to the OMB statement.The White House also objects to a provision that would expand the CMO’s authority, a key aspect of House Armed Services Committee Chair Mac Thornberry’s attempt to reform the department’s fourth estate. That section would authorize the CMO to carry out the elimination of agencies and activities, and to maximize efficiency across DOD for civilian resource management, logistics, services contracting and real estate management functions. The CMO would be required to certify that the department has achieved at least 25 percent savings from those functions by Jan. 1, 2021.“Section 911 would create contradictory and conflicting authorities and relationships between the CMO and office of the secretary of defense principal staff assistants. While the department appreciates the congressional intent, the CMO has all of the necessary authorities required to oversee efficiency and effectiveness related to the business aspect of covered activities,” OMB states.The House began debating H.R. 5515 Tuesday evening, adopting 98 amendments by voice vote and putting off roll call votes on four more controversial ones until Wednesday, reported CQ. Also on Tuesday night, the House Rules Committee was expected to allow votes on several other potentially contentious amendments. The chamber is expected to debate the bill through at least Wednesday.The bill text and committee report for H.R. 5515 can be found on the House Rules Committee website.Photo by Carmen Stevensonlast_img read more

Porsches 992generation 911 shows off its active aero trickery

first_img Share your voice Auto Tech Sports Cars Performance Cars The 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S is at the top of its game More From Roadshow Porsche’s 992-generation 911 is packed with all kinds of arcane technological wizardry, but some of the coolest bits involve the way that the 911 handles the air it’s moving through. To better explain (or maybe just show off) how the systems work, Porsche released a video on Thursday.The Porsche 911’s shape has always been slippery which is excellent for top speeds and fuel economy, but a modern sports car needs to do a lot more than go fast in a straight line. To that end, Porsche has used a number of active aerodynamic devices like its moveable decklid and adjustable air slats in the front grilles to help keep the car planted in the turns.The rear decklid functions like a spoiler, moving from closed to a low-drag open position to a more vertical position for maximum downforce depending on vehicle speed. The front slats open and close at varying speeds and engine loads to best balance aerodynamic drag with the engine’s cooling needs.Porsche has been messing around with active aerodynamics on its road cars since 1989 when it introduced the 964 chassis and its adjustable decklid spoiler. Porsche has since continued to play with the technology. The 991-generation 911 Turbo, for example, featured an inflatable rubber chin spoiler that could increase downforce without adding significant weight or complexity to the car.Considering that the 992 chassis just made its debut last year at the LA Auto Show, we’ll be curious to see what kind of trickery Porsche pulls out of its hat for the more aero-intensive Turbo and GT models of the future. 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Porschecenter_img Tags Porsche 1 Comment 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 40 Photoslast_img read more

Texas Teen Fugitives Caught After Escaping Texas Juvenile Prison

first_img Share Rob CrowTwo teen inmates have been caught a day after escaping from a juvenile prison in Giddings, Texas, about 100 miles northwest of Houston.The Texas Juvenile Justice Department said in a release that 16-year-olds Brice Ryan Karalis and Bryan Ernando Villanueva were arrested Sunday evening in Montgomery County. The two disappeared from the Giddings State School around 9 p.m. Saturday.The teens’ mode of escape was not released, and additional details about their apprehension were not immediately available.It was not immediately clear why Karalis or Villanueva were being held at the prison.last_img read more

2 Fatal Shootings Mark Baltimores First Homicides of 2019

first_imgBy The Associated PressBALTIMORE (AP) — Two men have been fatally shot in Baltimore, marking the city’s first homicides of 2019.News outlets quote Baltimore police as saying officers responded to a reported shooting Tuesday afternoon and found a 28-year-old man suffering multiple gunshot wounds. The man was taken to a hospital and pronounced dead.A police release says another shooting was reported about an hour later and responding officers found another man suffering apparent gunshot wounds. Police say he was pronounced dead at the scene.Police did not immediately release the identities of the slain men. Investigations into their deaths are ongoing.Police say the first reported shooting victim of the year was a 14-year-old boy whose head was grazed by a bullet. Baltimore had 309 homicides in 2018 and 342 homicides in 2017.last_img read more

Moms Arent the Only Ones who Pass on Mitochondrial DNA

first_imgAn illustration of mitochondria. A new study finds mitochondrial DNA can also come from the father, in some cases. (Credit: CI Photos/Shutterstock)If you think way, way back to your high school biology class, you might remember a little cellular structure called the mitochondrion. Its claim to fame is that it’s the “powerhouse” of the cell — the organelle in charge of creating energy. But it also contains its own DNA, separate from the traditional DNA we think of, which lives in the nucleus of a cell. That nuclear DNA contains genetic information from both of our parents. But in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), that genetic information only comes from one parent.In some organisms like algae and plants, males are the ones who pass on their mtDNA. In humans, however, this genetic information pretty much always came from mom. Well, until now, it seems. In a paper published in PNAS this week, an international team of researchers reveal they’ve found evidence of paternal mtDNA in 17 people from three separate families.Not Just Your Mom’s GenesIt all started with a four-year-old boy. He’d been experiencing fatigue, muscle pain and muscle weakness. His doctors suspected he might have a mitochondrial disease, in which the cellular structures slowly stop producing energy. So the boy’s doctors at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) sent his blood off for analysis.It was then that the paper’s lead author, Taosheng Huang, the director of mitochondrial medicine at CCHMC, noticed something was off. To make sure they weren’t making any mistakes, Huang and his CCHMC team gave more samples of the boy’s blood to other labs. But those independent analyses came back with the same results — the young patient had paternal mtDNA mixed in with the usual maternal genetic information.The unexpected results led Huang and his team to hunt down other people who might have the same anomaly in their cells. It turns out at least four people from different generations in the boy’s family have significant levels of both maternal and paternal mtDNA. And two other families each had members of multiple generations harboring biparental mtDNA.More Than a FlukeResearchers still aren’t 100 percent sure why mom’s mtDNA usually wins in the genetic battle of inheritance. They do know that, at least in simplistic animal models like the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, sperm cells contain a self-destruct gene that kicks in when they fuse with an egg. The gene marks the mitochondrial genetic info for destruction. (When researchers deleted that gene, paternal mtDNA survived longer in the offspring. But in turn, that meant higher rates of death for the embryos that carried that paternal mtDNA.)No one’s quite sure if this happens in humans yet, but it’s still practically unheard of for paternal mtDNA to pop up in humans. There’s only been one other promising case from 2002. Researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine that a male patient had significant levels of paternal mtDNA in his cells — and another team was able to verify the results. However, no other instances had turned up since, leading many experts to believe the findings were a fluke.But that Huang and his team have found the phenomenon in multiple generations in multiple families shows this isn’t just a fluke. Though the authors note there’s still a lot left to suss out — like how paternal mtDNA survives in the first place, and how exactly it’s passed on genetically — the results offer a new avenue of research that many didn’t think was available. The knowledge could help scientists better understand the complexity behind mitochondrial diseases.last_img read more

UK Prime Ministers letter to LGBTI people slammed as cheap empty PR

first_imgGAYSTARNEWS- On the 30th anniversary of the homophobic legislation section, 28 came into effect – The UK Prime Minister Theresa May has written a letter to the LGBTI community. And it’s already facing a backlash.In it she pledges her government’s support to: eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) ‘Help make us a country where no one feels the need to hide who they are or who they love.’Published in the latest issue of Gay Times, she also says an LGBT Action Plan will be published this summer following the results of a nationwide survey for the LGBTI community.GSN exclusively revealed in March, this survey meant the Home Office was considering a ban on gay conversion therapy.30 years since banning the ‘promotion of homosexuality’ in UK schoolsThe letter comes on the 30th anniversary of Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative government legislation banning the ‘promotion of homosexuality’ in schools.The law, repealed 15 years later, created a generation of young people and teachers afraid to speak about their sexuality.Today’s letter also addresses the ongoing delayed gender recognition consultation. May says it will be published ‘soon.’ The delay has come after a series of resignations from those in the Women’s and Equalities ministerial role.May says the action plan will set out ‘concrete steps the Government will take to improve lives for LGBT people.’‘We’ve also engaged with experts to understand better the limitations of the current system of gender recognition and will soon publish a public consultation on how we best reform the process.‘Words are cheap, it’s action that counts’The opposition party Labour have already slammed the letter as ’empty PR.’Shadow women and equalities minister Dawn Butler says: ‘All this Government seems to do is make announcements about future announcements, it’s just empty PR.‘Theresa May announced a consultation on the Gender Recognition Act last August, but nearly a year later it hasn’t even started.‘We need to see deeds, not just words, from the Conservatives. Today marks 30 years since Thatcher’s Government introduced the cruel Section 28, a grim moment in our country’s history, which was defended by Theresa May.’LGBTI rights campaigner Peter Tatchell says the May’s words are laudable but adds ‘words are cheap.’ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…center_img This is how Brexit could hurt you as an LGBTI person in the UK British PM Theresa May ‘sorry’ for voting against LGBTI issuesFour in 10 Brits think gay sex is unnatural, new poll findsWhat is happening to LGBTI rights in Malaysia?Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/uk-prime-ministers-letter-lgbti-slammed/ ‘It’s action that counts. The Prime Minister has imposed direct rule on Northern Ireland. She is legally entitled to legislate same-sex marriage but is refusing to do so, despite 76% public support for marriage equality. This is collusion with the homophobic DUP.‘Reforming the gender recognition process for trans people was agreed in principle ages ago. The planned new public consultation looks like a delaying tactic and a sop to anti-trans campaigners.‘Theresa May has declined to make equality and diversity lessons mandatory in every school, to reduce homophobic bullying and hate crime. That’s a big fail.’Last week for IDAHOBIT, Theresa May’s Instagram account posted a video about how introducing equal marriage was one of her ‘proudest moments.’Could Section 28 come back?Could LGBTI rights go backward after Brexit? The government promises they won’t. But there is no guarantee.A new report commisioned by Gay Star News argues that Section 28 couldn’t happen under the modern EU rules.But without EU membership, the UK has nothing to stop LGBTI-hating politicians from passing a similar law in future.In particular, the report recommends the UK retains the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights. This effectively guarantees many of the rights we enjoy today, politicians can’t just take them away. But the government says we don’t need the Charter in UK law post Brexit.One of the report’s authors, Jonathan Cooper, is a leading human rights barrister. He was involved in some of the key European court cases that led to improved LGBT rights in the UK.In the report, he argues that the loss of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights is a mistake:‘We are also removing from the UK’s jurisdiction the only international binding legal instrument that expressly prohibits discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation in the text of the document.‘That is counter-intuitive. Were those who voted to leave the EU voting to take away LGBT rights? Without replacing those rights with something equal or better? It is unlikely that was their intent.’Read More from Gay Star News:It’s time the Conservatives apologized to all of us for Section 28last_img read more

VIDEO Managing Gadolinium Safety

first_img Technology Reports View all 9 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Women’s Health View all 62 items Find more SCCT news and videos Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Information Technology View all 220 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D., FACR, vice president and director of advanced imaging at RadNet, discusses the latest research on the effects of gadolinium contrast retention following magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams, and how facilities can best manage its use. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting.center_img Videos | Contrast Media | August 03, 2018 VIDEO: Managing Gadolinium Safety Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Gadolinium Contrast Safety Update AHRAVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 11:17Loaded: 1.47%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -11:17 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Conference Coverage View all 396 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Recent Videos View all 606 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Find more SCCT news and videos Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Herelast_img read more

Measles warning issued for VancouverEdmonton passengers

first_img Posted by << Previous PostNext Post >> Share Tags: Travel Alert EDMONTON — Health officials in Alberta say people who were on a flight from Vancouver to Edmonton last month may be at risk for measles.Alberta Health Services says a person with measles flew on WestJet flight 186 that departed Vancouver on the evening of Feb. 24.Officials say people who were in Edmonton International Airport shortly after midnight until 3:30 a.m. on Feb. 25 are also at risk.The warning applies to people who were born after 1970 and who haven’t already had measles, or received two doses of the measles vaccine.People born before 1970 are generally considered immune because they were likely exposed to measles that was circulating in the population before that time.The health agency says it is directly contacting people who were on the flight, and it asks that people who were in the airport to stay home and call Health Link at 811 before visiting any health care facility or provider.center_img The Canadian Press Measles warning issued for Vancouver-Edmonton passengers Monday, March 6, 2017 last_img read more

Akkiratourz convicted of failing to hold funds in trust account

first_img Tuesday, July 3, 2018 Share Akkiratourz convicted of failing to hold funds in trust account << Previous PostNext Post >> TORONTO — Toronto-based Akkiratourz Ltd. has been ordered by the Court to pay $75,000 in fines after being convicted of three separate counts.After being charged by TICO, Akkiratourz was convicted of two counts of failing to hold customer funds in a designated trust account and one count of failing to deposit customer funds in a designated trust account.Ms. Gukadharsini Packiyanathan, a Director and Officer of Akkiratourz Ltd., pleaded guilty and was convicted of three counts of failing to take reasonable care to prevent Akkiratourz from committing the aforementioned trust accounting offences, contrary to S. 31(2) of the Travel Industry Act.The Court ordered Akkiratourz to pay fines of $20,000 per count on each of the three counts for a total fine, including 25% surcharges, of $75,000.The Court also ordered Ms. Packiyanathan be placed on probation for two years, including supervised requirements, such as 200 hours community service and a fine of $6,500 payable to the Ontario Travel Industry Compensation Fund, paid in full on or before June 26, 2020. Ms. Packiyanathan is also prohibited from being a travel agent or travel wholesaler, or an Officer, director, employee of contractor of a travel agent or travel wholesaler for two years.More news:  ‘Turn around year’ for TPI brings double-digit growthIn June 2017, TICO’s Board of Directors approved a payment of $24,495 to assist 20 consumers who failed to receive travel services following the closure of Akkiratourz.center_img Travelweek Group Posted by Tags: TICOlast_img read more