Category: vfyoxdnx

Special Representative of the Secretary-General Karin Landgren’s Remarks

first_imgThis is a remarkable event and I want to begin, Madam President, Dr. Sawyer; Cllr. Verdier, Madam Intelmann, my colleagues, members of the LACC, by congratulating you on hosting this event and on it being public. That this dialogue be public is extremely important and this is a further indication of the strong political will to go after corruption in all its forms. Going after corruption is important in its own right, as we have heard, but it is also important because this impoverishes Liberia.Corruption keeps Liberia poor; and it fractures Liberians. It creates and deepens divisions among Liberians, and the country can’t afford that either. If Ebola taught us one thing, it taught us about the risks of mistrust; and the mistrust that it showed among people but also in public institutions and I think of this now in particular in the context of UNMIL drawdown. Public confidence in national institutions is the number one need as UNMIL draws down and prepares to close. Yes, it is important to strengthen the LNP. It’s absolutely critical that they perform their functions, but we know that the police are not standing at everyone’s right shoulder, looking over it and keeping them doing the right thing. The police are what you reach for when public order is not being maintained. The police are not our conscience. The police are not going to keep our public institutions functioning as they must.When the UN Security Council met in December and adopted a resolution on Liberia and on UNMIL, they encouraged the Government of Liberia to prioritize combating corruption, promoting efficiency and good governance. The Security Council is also saying how central this is to Liberia’s future stability. The rule of law is central to stability, and it is the opposite of corruption. It is the opposite to the abuse of power. I think Dr. Sawyer’s point on building citizenship is absolutely spot on. This is what will sustain Liberia over time.  So as Liberia continues to strengthen its national integrity institutions, one thing I would like to put on the table for consideration is the possibility of encouraging discussion and development of specific integrity indicators. Many partners here in this room are one hundred percent supportive of your efforts. You know that. But what are the indicators we should all be looking at, in particular, to measure and assess your success in these endeavors?What will success look like one year from now, two years from now? We know and I hear this from Liberians all the time, that there are a hundred things that to be done, a thousand things to be done. They won’t all happen in a year.  Where do you want to be one year from now? What can we support you in most strongly and one question there is whether corruption has yet become socially unacceptable as many speakers have noted. The law is one thing, but people’s own behavior is another. Where are expectations? When is society going to push against corruption?The education system was alluded to – we know from Liberia’s own reports that a high number of students are asked to give money for grades. Or they’re asked to give sex for grades. Is this what we want children to learn in school, that the shadow system, the parallel system is more powerful than the formal system and than the law? That the content of  education, the content of their own study, what they are investing time in, means so little and above all that these demands by their  teachers, by their role models can be made with complete impunity?  That is not a good start in life for children.So, again I encourage the active and public pursuit of accountability initiatives especially around enforcement. I absolutely salute and congratulate the work done to date by the LACC and the Government of Liberia’s determination to see this carried on. And let me conclude by saying that the United Nations is fully with you in this effort. Thank you.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

10th National Day Oration Still Relevant 160 Years Later

first_img(A Perspective) By Edmund Zar-Zar BargblorHistory, according to Robert Penn Warren (a poet, novelist, and literary critic), cannot give us a program for the future, but it can give us a full understanding of ourselves and our common humanity, so that we can better face the future. Professor J. Corfield also pointed out in her article that revisiting a country’s history helps us to understand the linkages between her past and present. Understanding a nation’s history is not just ‘useful,’ it is essential (royalholloway.ac.uk).Understanding Liberia’s history for example, will help us to re-build our socioeconomic and political institutions, and as may well be necessary also to change those behaviors that are not congruent to nation building. What we have become today in Liberia is the result of the seeds that were planted by Liberia’s founding fathers, many, many years ago; founding fathers that failed to heed the advice and wisdom of a visionary personality.Madame Naomi Anderson Whittaker echoed in her article (Whittaker, CERS Working Paper, 2015), that the black settlers in Liberia mimicked white rule from their arrival in 1822 in several ways, and became “proxy whites” through the prism of culture (Feagin, 2009). Claims to whiteness were tied to Diaspora status and cultural affect, as well as one’s place on the scale of colorism or shadism. Joseph Jenkins Roberts and other Americo-Liberians at the time, took pride in their American-ness, and saw themselves as above the Indigenous Africans (Laidlaw, 2012) due to the language, religion and methods of industry that they had collectively brought with them (McCall, 1956), reproducing white supremacist hierarchies (Mills, 2014). One could argue that antebellum racial politics were transferred to Liberia through the colonized minds of the freed slaves, with the racism they had experienced being reproduced through their oppressed minds (Feagin, 2009), as well as the colorism that had developed among slaves in the US, which had stopped them working together to escape (Whittaker, CERS Working Paper,2015).Irrespective of the misguided mindsets of Liberia’s founding fathers as reflected above, Liberia was blessed at the time with the presence of a man of honor and vision. God, in His infinite wisdom, gave Liberia a certain man during her initial inception as a sovereign nation. The following poem highlights such a man of honor.“God, give us a Man! A time like this demandsStrong mind, great heart, true faith and ready hands;Man, whom the lust of office does not kill;Man, whom the spoils of office cannot buy;Man, who possessed opinions and a will;Man, who had honor;Man, who didn’t lie;Man, who stood before President Joseph Jerkins Roberts and othersAnd damn their treacherous flatteries without winking!Tall man, sun-crowned, who live above the fogIn public duty and in private thinking;For while the rabble, with their thumb-worn creeds,Their large professions and their little deeds,Mingle in selfish strife, lo! Freedom weeps,Wrong rules the land and waiting justice sleeps.”(modified poem: Josiah Gilbert Holland (1819-1881)).Edward Wilmot Blyden (1832-1912) was that man. He was a Liberian educator and statesman. More than any other figure, he laid the foundation of West African nationalism and Pan Africanism. He was born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, on Aug. 3, 1832 of free, literate parents. He went to the United States in May 1850 and sought to enter a theological college, but was turned down because of his race. In January 1851, he emigrated to Liberia, (biography.yourdictionary.com/edward-wilmot-blyden).On July 27, 1857, he was Liberia’s Independence Day Guest Speaker in Monrovia. He spoke on the following topic: Liberia As She Is; And the Present Duty Of Her Citizens. The highlight of his presentation is reflected below for the intellectual consumption of the reading public. Interestingly, some of the ‘evil attributes’ that he spoke about, continue to take place in contemporary Liberia.Liberia as She is; and the Present Duty of her Citizens. (Dr. Blyden’s Speech, 160 years ago)“What are the moral causes of the present evils in Liberia?…as a people, we have been in too much haste to be rich. Relinquishing the pursuit of those attributes that would fit us for the faithful discharge of our peculiar duties as men, as Liberians, as an infant nation, we have used every possible measure to enhance our pecuniary importance; and in the precipitate efforts at wealth, we have not been careful as to what means we have employed. The desire to be rich, or to appear to be rich, pervades all classes. The love of money…has grown upon us to such a degree that all other avenues of distinction seem but trifling in comparison of those which lead to the acquisition of money. To be rich seems with many ‘the chief end of man.’ Hence, no talents, no endowment of the mind, no skill or knowledge, no amount of education, is appreciated only so far as it will pay….This fact has operated greatly in retarding the literary progress of our youth…CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION“Another cause of our adversity may be seen in the unjustifiable extravagance in which we indulge; in that luxury of expenditure for houses, for dress, for furniture, for food, constantly made the reprehensible remark by thinking foreigners. We are in dreadful error regarding our country, if we suppose we are truly prosperous. Our prosperity is not real; it is false; it is fictitious. The prosperity of a nation is real when the springs of the prosperity are contained within itself, in the hands of its citizens; when it depends for its existence upon its own resources; when it is independent.“But this is not the case in Liberia. We are, as a nation, upheld by foreigners. We are entirely dependent upon foreigners for our schools, for churches, for preachers, for teachers. Most of the talent of the country is in the employ and at the control of foreigners. Those thus employed must ever hold their talents and their efforts subservient, not to what they conceive to be the interests of their country, but to the desires and direction of foreign employers…What we wish to bring before our minds today is the humiliating fact, that nearly all the talent of Liberia—talent not in ordinary men, but in our principal men—is supported by foreign means and controlled by foreign influence. And yet, in the face of these humbling realities, we boast of our civilization, of our prosperity, of our independence, and indulge in unjustifiable extravagance…the money lavished upon houses, which add nothing to health and comfort; upon dress, which does not increase the dignity and beauty of personal appearance; the large sums laid out in expensive furniture…the great amount consumed in the luxuries of the table would go a great way in keeping our streets clear of weeds, in felling the dense forests around us, in reclaiming the wilderness, in cultivating the soil, in civilizing our…brethren…Look at the numbers who…to advance to, or maintain this [extravagant] style of living, flock to the fostering arms and sheltering wings of these [foreign] societies.“Thus dis-honesty stalks abroad under the semblance of piety; and impiety assumes the appearance of religion for the sake of gain. And… this extravagant manner of living…are made in the minds of many the standard of respectability…we attach more importance to display than to reality. There is very little that is substantial about us…It is our duty to learn that there are other objects of infinitely greater importance than wealth in our rising country…A higher destiny is ours: our duty and privilege is the laying of the foundation of future empires in Africa…It is our duty to curtail our superfluous expenditures. There should be retrenchment of our expenditures for splendid edifices….“Let our surplus means be beneficially expended; let it be vested in the improvement of our country, in placing our prosperity upon a safer and more permanent foundation—in rendering ourselves independent…It is our duty to labor. We dwell in a country rich in resources, which with little exertion can be called forth in sufficient variety and abundance to render us comfortable and independent. But there is a fatal lack of productive industry among us…The commerce of the country has always been in such articles as our citizens have had no part in producing; hence we acquire wealth from this source without helping to create it. We purchase the palm oil and camwood and ivory from the natives giving them in exchange articles of foreign production…“The prosperity arising from our commerce is almost as evanescent as that based on missionary appropriations. Foreigners on the one hand, and the natives on the other, are our supporters…we must either abandon our state of utter dependency upon foreigners, by creating the means of supplying our own wants, or relinquish our profession of liberty as a nation. A state of dependency is entirely incongruous with a statue of liberty…The…rich and fertile soil…invites us to its cultivation. Nothing should be allowed to interfere between us and the soil…(Blackhistoryheroes.com).”I was moved with sadness upon reflection of the content of Edward Wilmot Blyden’s   speech, relevant to the prosperity of our nation: “Our prosperity is not real; it is false; it is fictitious. The prosperity of a nation is real when the springs of the prosperity are contained within itself, in the hands of its citizens; when it depends for its existence upon its own resources; when it is independent. But this is not the case in Liberia. We are, as a nation, upheld by foreigners. We are entirely dependent upon foreigners for our schools, for churches, for preachers, for teachers. Most of the talent of the country is in the employ and at the control of foreigners…”The legacy of Dr. Edward Wilmot Blyden has challenged every Liberian, especially those seeking the highest office, to help Liberia live up to her true potential as a sovereign African nation. Liberia’s past, even the relatively recent past, is in the minds of most of us, shrouded by mists and only very vaguely perceived. Interestingly, some of the ‘evil attributes’ that he spoke about continue to take place in contemporary Liberia. Let us endeavor as Liberians to foster the spirit of true national reconciliation, and embrace all Liberians, be it Americo-Liberians, Mandingoes or Krahns , for Liberia belongs to us all.Indeed, our ignorance of the past is not the result of a lack of information, but of our indifference to its lessons. Our view of history shapes the way we view the present, and therefore it dictates what answers we offer to solve our current socioeconomic or political problems.Happy “July 26” to all!The Author: Mr. Edmund Zar-Zar Bargblor is an Educator. He is a graduate of Cuttington University, Liberia; Howard University, Washington, D.C., and Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. He can be contacted at: ezbargblor@aol.com Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window),By Edmund Zar-Zar BargblorHistory, according to Robert Penn Warren (a poet, novelist, and literary critic), cannot give us a program for the future, but it can give us a full understanding of ourselves and our common humanity, so that we can better face the future. Professor J. Corfield also pointed out in her article that revisiting a country’s history helps us to understand the linkages between her past and present. Understanding a nation’s history is not just ‘useful,’ it is essential (royalholloway.ac.uk).Understanding Liberia’s history for example, will help us to re-build our socioeconomic and political institutions, and as may well be necessary also to change those behaviors that are not congruent to nation building. What we have become today in Liberia is the result of the seeds that were planted by Liberia’s founding fathers, many, many years ago; founding fathers that failed to heed the advice and wisdom of a visionary personality.Madame Naomi Anderson Whittaker echoed in her article (Whittaker, CERS Working Paper, 2015), that the black settlers in Liberia mimicked white rule from their arrival in 1822 in several ways, and became “proxy whites” through the prism of culture (Feagin, 2009). Claims to whiteness were tied to Diaspora status and cultural affect, as well as one’s place on the scale of colorism or shadism. Joseph Jenkins Roberts and other Americo-Liberians at the time, took pride in their American-ness, and saw themselves as above the Indigenous Africans (Laidlaw, 2012) due to the language, religion and methods of industry that they had collectively brought with them (McCall, 1956), reproducing white supremacist hierarchies (Mills, 2014). One could argue that antebellum racial politics were transferred to Liberia through the colonized minds of the freed slaves, with the racism they had experienced being reproduced through their oppressed minds (Feagin, 2009), as well as the colorism that had developed among slaves in the US, which had stopped them working together to escape (Whittaker, CERS Working Paper,2015).Irrespective of the misguided mindsets of Liberia’s founding fathers as reflected above, Liberia was blessed at the time with the presence of a man of honor and vision. God, in His infinite wisdom, gave Liberia a certain man during her initial inception as a sovereign nation. The following poem highlights such a man of honor.“God, give us a Man! A time like this demandsStrong mind, great heart, true faith and ready hands;Man, whom the lust of office does not kill;Man, whom the spoils of office cannot buy;Man, who possessed opinions and a will;Man, who had honor;Man, who didn’t lie;Man, who stood before President Joseph Jerkins Roberts and othersAnd damn their treacherous flatteries without winking!Tall man, sun-crowned, who live above the fogIn public duty and in private thinking;For while the rabble, with their thumb-worn creeds,Their large professions and their little deeds,Mingle in selfish strife, lo! Freedom weeps,Wrong rules the land and waiting justice sleeps.”(modified poem: Josiah Gilbert Holland (1819-1881)).Edward Wilmot Blyden (1832-1912) was that man. He was a Liberian educator and statesman. More than any other figure, he laid the foundation of West African nationalism and Pan Africanism. He was born in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, on Aug. 3, 1832 of free, literate parents. He went to the United States in May 1850 and sought to enter a theological college, but was turned down because of his race. In January 1851, he emigrated to Liberia, (biography.yourdictionary.com/edward-wilmot-blyden).On July 27, 1857, he was Liberia’s Independence Day Guest Speaker in Monrovia. He spoke on the following topic: Liberia As She Is; And the Present Duty Of Her Citizens. The highlight of his presentation is reflected below for the intellectual consumption of the reading public. Interestingly, some of the ‘evil attributes’ that he spoke about, continue to take place in contemporary Liberia.Liberia as She is; and the Present Duty of her Citizens. (Dr. Blyden’s Speech, 160 years ago)“What are the moral causes of the present evils in Liberia?…as a people, we have been in too much haste to be rich. Relinquishing the pursuit of those attributes that would fit us for the faithful discharge of our peculiar duties as men, as Liberians, as an infant nation, we have used every possible measure to enhance our pecuniary importance; and in the precipitate efforts at wealth, we have not been careful as to what means we have employed. The desire to be rich, or to appear to be rich, pervades all classes. The love of money…has grown upon us to such a degree that all other avenues of distinction seem but trifling in comparison of those which lead to the acquisition of money. To be rich seems with many ‘the chief end of man.’ Hence, no talents, no endowment of the mind, no skill or knowledge, no amount of education, is appreciated only so far as it will pay….This fact has operated greatly in retarding the literary progress of our youth…CONSPICUOUS CONSUMPTION“Another cause of our adversity may be seen in the unjustifiable extravagance in which we indulge; in that luxury of expenditure for houses, for dress, for furniture, for food, constantly made the reprehensible remark by thinking foreigners. We are in dreadful error regarding our country, if we suppose we are truly prosperous. Our prosperity is not real; it is false; it is fictitious. The prosperity of a nation is real when the springs of the prosperity are contained within itself, in the hands of its citizens; when it depends for its existence upon its own resources; when it is independent.“But this is not the case in Liberia. We are, as a nation, upheld by foreigners. We are entirely dependent upon foreigners for our schools, for churches, for preachers, for teachers. Most of the talent of the country is in the employ and at the control of foreigners. Those thus employed must ever hold their talents and their efforts subservient, not to what they conceive to be the interests of their country, but to the desires and direction of foreign employers…What we wish to bring before our minds today is the humiliating fact, that nearly all the talent of Liberia—talent not in ordinary men, but in our principal men—is supported by foreign means and controlled by foreign influence. And yet, in the face of these humbling realities, we boast of our civilization, of our prosperity, of our independence, and indulge in unjustifiable extravagance…the money lavished upon houses, which add nothing to health and comfort; upon dress, which does not increase the dignity and beauty of personal appearance; the large sums laid out in expensive furniture…the great amount consumed in the luxuries of the table would go a great way in keeping our streets clear of weeds, in felling the dense forests around us, in reclaiming the wilderness, in cultivating the soil, in civilizing our…brethren…Look at the numbers who…to advance to, or maintain this [extravagant] style of living, flock to the fostering arms and sheltering wings of these [foreign] societies.“Thus dis-honesty stalks abroad under the semblance of piety; and impiety assumes the appearance of religion for the sake of gain. And… this extravagant manner of living…are made in the minds of many the standard of respectability…we attach more importance to display than to reality. There is very little that is substantial about us…It is our duty to learn that there are other objects of infinitely greater importance than wealth in our rising country…A higher destiny is ours: our duty and privilege is the laying of the foundation of future empires in Africa…It is our duty to curtail our superfluous expenditures. There should be retrenchment of our expenditures for splendid edifices….“Let our surplus means be beneficially expended; let it be vested in the improvement of our country, in placing our prosperity upon a safer and more permanent foundation—in rendering ourselves independent…It is our duty to labor. We dwell in a country rich in resources, which with little exertion can be called forth in sufficient variety and abundance to render us comfortable and independent. But there is a fatal lack of productive industry among us…The commerce of the country has always been in such articles as our citizens have had no part in producing; hence we acquire wealth from this source without helping to create it. We purchase the palm oil and camwood and ivory from the natives giving them in exchange articles of foreign production…“The prosperity arising from our commerce is almost as evanescent as that based on missionary appropriations. Foreigners on the one hand, and the natives on the other, are our supporters…we must either abandon our state of utter dependency upon foreigners, by creating the means of supplying our own wants, or relinquish our profession of liberty as a nation. A state of dependency is entirely incongruous with a statue of liberty…The…rich and fertile soil…invites us to its cultivation. Nothing should be allowed to interfere between us and the soil…(Blackhistoryheroes.com).”I was moved with sadness upon reflection of the content of Edward Wilmot Blyden’s   speech, relevant to the prosperity of our nation: “Our prosperity is not real; it is false; it is fictitious. The prosperity of a nation is real when the springs of the prosperity are contained within itself, in the hands of its citizens; when it depends for its existence upon its own resources; when it is independent. But this is not the case in Liberia. We are, as a nation, upheld by foreigners. We are entirely dependent upon foreigners for our schools, for churches, for preachers, for teachers. Most of the talent of the country is in the employ and at the control of foreigners…”The legacy of Dr. Edward Wilmot Blyden has challenged every Liberian, especially those seeking the highest office, to help Liberia live up to her true potential as a sovereign African nation. Liberia’s past, even the relatively recent past, is in the minds of most of us, shrouded by mists and only very vaguely perceived. Interestingly, some of the ‘evil attributes’ that he spoke about continue to take place in contemporary Liberia. Let us endeavor as Liberians to foster the spirit of true national reconciliation, and embrace all Liberians, be it Americo-Liberians, Mandingoes or Krahns , for Liberia belongs to us all.Indeed, our ignorance of the past is not the result of a lack of information, but of our indifference to its lessons. Our view of history shapes the way we view the present, and therefore it dictates what answers we offer to solve our current socioeconomic or political problems.Happy “July 26” to all!The Author: Mr. Edmund Zar-Zar Bargblor is an Educator. He is a graduate of Cuttington University, Liberia; Howard University, Washington, D.C., and Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. He can be contacted at: ezbargblor@aol.comlast_img read more

Butiesue Residents Cry for Safe Drinking Water

first_imga woman fetches water from a wellBy Franklin N. KwenahCitizens of Butiesue Town in District #3, Bong County, are said to be in dire need of safe drinking water and healthcare services.Town Chief Leemu Sackie, speaking to newsman, said since the establishment of the town in the late 60’s, they have never had access to safe drinking water and healthcare services.According to Chief Sackie, they usually fetch drinking water from a nearby creek, which has resulted to many falling ill with diarrhea and other water-borne diseases that have led to the death of many children and mothers.She further noted that due to serious water-borne diseases and diarrhea, they decided to dig a well that would help to minimize the occurrence of these water borne-illnesses and save the lives of women and children. However, she added that problems still exist in terms of safe drinking water.”This one well cannot serve all the houses in the town; and when it gets dry and dirty during the dry season, we have to get back to drinking the creek water,” she said.The Butiesue Town Chief made special reference to the month of January, February and March, adding that citizens were all in the bushes looking for safe water to drink.She is calling on the government and other humanitarian organizations to come to their aid. “In order to save lives in the district, the government and organizations need to help us; at least to construct some hand pumps in our town so that citizens can have access to safe drinking water,” Chief Sackie stressed.Touching on the health problem in the area, Town Chief Sackie explained that it is one of the challenging issues that her town is faced with. She said pregnant women and sick people from the town are transported to Phebe Hospital in order to seek medical assistance. “When a big belly is in pain in the town, she has to be carried in a hammock to Phebe, and the road is far,” she explained to this paper.She further appealed to the central government to assist them to construct a motor road, in order to help them have access to a safe healthcare delivery system.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

CLOSING TIME?

first_imgAs change swirled through the city’s gleaming Pier Avenue during the last half century, the Mermaid has remained a constant, with good drinks and great people, he said. “I just can’t believe they’re going to do this,” the 73-year-old said. “It’ll break my heart.” Thelen bought the bar in 1954 – an era still reflected in the establishment’s vintage decor. And in more than 50 years of business, the two-time Hermosa Beach mayor closed the tavern just twice, Albergate said: once when President Kennedy was shot, and again in 1992 during the Los Angeles riots. But today the 7,000-square-foot ocean-front property – also housing Good Stuff restaurant and the Poop Deck bar – is all but a sitting duck for a developer eyeing built-out Hermosa Beach. The property is currently zoned for light commercial, and City Councilman Sam Edgerton, a longtime Mermaid regular, said a builder has several choices for development, including a similar business or a hotel. Either way, the Mermaid’s void will create sweeping changes in Pier Plaza’s landscape, he said. “The Mermaid was and is the last place you can go to in any of the beach cities where you can get a great table with an ocean view and sit beside people of all generations and everyone is totally comfortable,” Edgerton said. But Mermaid lovers are holding out hope the landmark bar would stay. “There have been some interested (buyers), but also I think the citizens of Hermosa would like to see it stay,” Albergate said. “It’s the heart and soul of the plaza.” Good Stuff owner Cris Bennett had a laid-back attitude toward the possible sale of his restaurant’s land. “It’s just sad to think that this all might be coming to an end,” he said. “We’re just going to keep doing business as usual. I think we’re just going to sit tight and see what happens.” Spirits were also good at the Mermaid during an unusually crowded afternoon last week. “Mermaid Realty. This is Kenny,” bartender Tom Slater answered the shrilling telephone in his best game show host voice. Having suffered through the closings of other bars where he worked, Slater didn’t seem too worried about the Mermaid’s fate. “My wife is looking for another two jobs so I can have a little retirement,” he joked. Albergate figured her late father wouldn’t be pleased about the bar’s sale. Thelen loved the place, and after he took ill about five years ago, his family kept the Mermaid open to “keep Dad running,” she said. “This is `Cheers’ on the beach,” Albergate said. andrea.woodhouse@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.The Strand-front property housing the landmark bar in Hermosa Beach has hit the market for $27 million, nearly three months after longtime owner Quentin “Boots” Thelen died, said his stepdaughter, Diana Albergate. Thelen’s six heirs, including Albergate, didn’t struggle with their decision to sell – with the estate tax man knocking, they didn’t have a choice, she said. “We hate to have to do this, but the federal government demands its unfair share,” Albergate said. Also for sale is an adjacent 6,900-square-foot building that faces Pier Plaza and houses four businesses – Mexican restaurant Cantina Real, Lappert’s Ice Cream, Avanti Jewelers and Pier Surf. The family is asking $6.5 million for the property. Sipping a vodka tonic at his favorite drinking spot, Tom Barnett said he was stunned to hear the Mermaid’s land was for sale. By Andrea Woodhouse STAFF WRITER The regulars at the Mermaid, the iconic, wood-paneled, Naugahyde- upholstered watering hole in Hermosa Beach, must be be crying in their beers. last_img

DELIGHT FOR CLOUGHANEELY LADIES STAR RÓISÍN NÍ CHUIREÁIN AS SHE WINS ULSTER TITLE WITH DONEGAL

first_imgCloughaneely GAA News:***Donegal Ladies Ulster Final***Comghairdeas ó chroí le Róisín Ní Chuireáin agus le mná Dhún na nGall a bhain Craobh Uladh Dé Domhnaigh seo chaite. Bhuail siad Muineachán 2-12|1-10. Seo an chéad uair a bhain Dún na nGall Craobh Shinsireach Uladh i bPeil na mBan! Traoslaímid leo uilig.Congratulations to Cloughaneely’s Roisín Ní Chuireáin and the Donegal senior ladies on winning the Ulster Final on Sunday against Monaghan, 2-12|1-10! This is the first time Donegal ladies have win this title! Well done to the girls and management team!***Cloughaneely 5k Run/Walk*** Our final 5K is due to be held on August 26th (entry fee – €3 per child, €5 per adult – family rates available –all levels of fitness welcome to walk or run!!); so we encourage as many of you as possible to come along and join in the fun while also supporting the club. Food and refreshments will be supplied afterwards!***Disco in Óstan Loch Áltan***There will be a disco held in Óstan Loch Áltan on Wednesday August 12th with DJ Ed. Doors open 11 p.m. and admission is €10. Strictly over 18’s. So for those of you who are looking for a good night out (perhaps you are after picking up those leaving cert results!!) this is the perfect place to go! A variety of cocktails will be available at the front bar!***Pouletpoo/Chicken Poop Bingo*** The Club are currently running this fundraiser with a difference! We are currently selling ‘squares’ at €5 a square. If you guess the square the chicken poops in you win €100! The event itself is due to take place on Saturday August 1st with venue yet to be confirmed. If you come across any of our volunteers selling the squares we would greatly appreciate your support in purchasing a square! Or you can contact one of our club officers to purchase a square!***100 Club Winners –June***Congratulations to following 100 Club winners for June:€500 – Joe McGarvey (post office)€100 – Tom Feeney, Pat McNickle, Terry Duggan, Brian Cannon, Murt Collins*** GAA Cúl Camp – Thanks to all!***D’éirigh go geal leis an Champa Cúl a d’eagraigh an Club an tseachtain seo chaite. Buíochas mór don páistí uilig a bhí páirteach sa champa agus de gach duine a chuidigh le heagrú na seachtaine.Cloughaneely held another very successful cúl camp last week. Well done to all the kids who partook and many thanks to all of you who helped out in organising the camp! Many thanks to county star Odhrán Mac Niallais for his attendance and assistance during the camp!***Notices for Club Notes***All notices to be included in the club notes must be with the PRO by 7 p.m on Monday evenings to ensure inclusion in the notes. Tel: 086-1567503**Facebook/Twitter***Please find us on facebook and follow us on twitter (@clgcloughaneely) for regular updates on what’s going on in the club as well as live game updates! DELIGHT FOR CLOUGHANEELY LADIES STAR RÓISÍN NÍ CHUIREÁIN AS SHE WINS ULSTER TITLE WITH DONEGAL was last modified: July 28th, 2015 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Sportlast_img read more

AC Milan keen to keep Chelsea misfit until the summer

first_img moving on And now, according to Gazzetta dello Sport, Milan have shelved plans to end Bakayoko’s loan in January.The club’s coaching staff have been won over by the former Monaco man and plan to keep him until at least the summer.Milan will then decide whether to make a permanent move for Bakayoko, who is attracting interest from clubs in France too. RANKED AC Milan have binned plans to cancel Chelsea midfielder Tiemoue Bakayoko’s loan in January.The Frenchman moved to the San Siro club in the summer after being deemed surplus to requirements at Stamford Bridge. LIVING THE DREAM Bakayoko is starting to thrive at the San Siro Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Bakayoko struggled in his debut season with the Blues REVEALED Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January LATEST Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father IN DEMAND Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland The 24-year-old made a slow start to life in Italy, though, as he struggled to adapt to his new surroundings in Serie A.That led to reports surfacing that Bakayoko could be sent back to Chelsea in January with six months to run on his loan.However, more recently the midfielder has begun to find his feet and he has impressed over the past few weeks. The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star 2 Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer Chelsea fans lost patience with the midfielder shortly after he arrived from Monaco in the summer for 2017.Bakayoko failed to live up to his £40m price tag, with the pace of the Premier League proving too much for him to handle. targets targets Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti 2 Latest Transfer Newslast_img read more

TWO MEN RESCUED AFTER FISHING BOAT BREAKS DOWN

first_imgTwo men had to be rescued after their small fishing vessel broke down in Donegal Bay earlier today.Arranmore Lifeboat: Called out todayThe Arranmore Lifeboat received a call just before noon and traveled to the scene of the incident.A local trawler from Killybegs, which was in the area, has been with the vessel. Noreen Flanagan of the Arranmore Lifeboat said the men are in no immediate danger.They were due to be reached by the lifeboat just after 1pm and will be towed back to Killybegs Harbour. TWO MEN RESCUED AFTER FISHING BOAT BREAKS DOWN was last modified: October 17th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ARRANMORE LIFEBOATdonegal bayfishing vesselrescuelast_img read more

TWO CARS STOLEN FROM HOUSE IN OVERNIGHT BURGLARY

first_imgGardai are investigating the theft of two cars from outside the same house in Letterkenny overnight.The burglars broke into a house and stole the keys to the vehicles.The two cars, a silver Peugeot 307 and a black Renault Clio, were taken from outside a house in the Long Lane. The Peugeot’s registration is 07 DL 261 while the Renault’s is 12 WX 269.The gang also stolen laptops and other items while in the house.Nobody was hurt during the raid which took place in the early hours of the morning.A Garda forensics team are at the scene of the burglary at present. A Garda spokesman has appealed to anyone who was in the area at the time and may have noticed anybody acting suspiciously to contact them.Local Sinn Fein Councillor Gerry Mc Monagle has strongly condemned those responsible for last night’s break-in.Cllr Mc Monagle said “The Lady whose house was targeted by these thieves is one of the hardest working community activists in Letterkenny and someone who has dedicated her life to helping those who are most vulnerable in our community.“The community of Letterkenny are very angry that this lady has become the most recent victim of these heartless thieves. I would appeal to anyone who has any information whatsoever to get in contact with the Gardai.“These criminals must be caught. They have no place in our society, all they bring is anguish and hurt to our communities and the sooner they are caught the better,” he said. TWO CARS STOLEN FROM HOUSE IN OVERNIGHT BURGLARY was last modified: March 12th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:burglaryletterkennyTHEFTSlast_img read more

Twin Towns businesses demand answers over recent traffic gridlock

first_imgBallybofey and Stranorlar Chamber of Commerce has held an urgent meeting with Donegal County Council and local councillors following the recent traffic gridlock in the area.The chamber said there was a lack of co-ordination and communication of the various ongoing road works, and the consequent loss of business and revenue to their members was obvious.The chamber met with the Director of Roads, John McLaughlin, and other senior Roads engineers on Wednesday 18th July. A spokesperson for the chamber said are many responses outstanding and we are expecting further answers from the Council early next week.However below is a summary of key points and actionsAll areas• We requested that the Council explore free parking in the Navenny Car Park and 30 minutes on the Main Street. We are chasing an early response. • We demanded better signage and upgrading of yellow boxes across the towns.• Several proposals were raised that concessions should be made to businesses that have experienced substantial reductions in turnover. Businesses were advised to liaise one to one with the Council Rates Department. This point will be raised at the next Chamber meeting.Leah Fairman, Manager, B&S Chamber of CommerceMcClays Corner* The lights at McClays corner will remain off for the foreseeable future and will not be put on without consultation with Chamber members.BridgeThe Chamber has demanded that the two lanes of traffic will remain open on the bridge from Monday morning (23rd) when the contractors return. Any works requiring lane closure should be completed after 7pm Donegal Road• LIDL TO TSA: The TII are presently closing a 500m sections of road at a time. It is taking approximately 10 weeks to complete both sides of the road for these sections. We demanded that this work move to a 250m section which will automatically reduce traffic delays by 50%• LIDL TO TSA: We secured manned traffic management at all times until a minimum of 8pm at night.• LIDL TO TSA: We demanded traffic management to ease traffic flow on the road from the LIDL T-junction down to Trusk Road • LIDL TO TSA: We demanded that works are extended longer into the evening to shorten the working times for the project overall.• DONEGAL ROAD – N15 AT CAPPRY. We were advised that traffic works will start on the N15 at the Cappry Road coming in to the town starting from 23 July. This is being done in order to speed up the completion of the works on the Donegal Road. We have insisted that these roadworks have a manned traffic flow management, and not traffic lights, while the impact of this re-opening is monitored.Meenglass/ Navenny Road/ Dreenan/The CrossIt was brought to our attention at the meeting that Irish Water are planning to put water mains on the back road from the Meenglass, via Navenny, via Dreenan to the Cross. We do not have a start date for this as yet.We have urgently requested a joint meeting with Irish Water and the Council Roads Department to make sure all areas are being co-ordinated with as little disruption to the towns as possible.Stranorlar Main StreetMinor surfacing works are planned for Stranorlar in the next 10 days. We have been assured that all works will be completed at night and the road will be reinstated for morning traffic.The County Council Roads Office has agreed to be in regular communication with Leah Fairman, Manager, B&S Chamber of Commerce, to keep all roadworks under constant review. We will ensure co-ordination and communication to our Members.We are inviting all businesses to an open meeting on Tuesday 31 July at 11am to review progress and get feedback on the measures put in place to date. However, we encourage all Members not to wait until this meeting to raise any concerns.Concerns and issues should be raised to Leah Fairman on 087 607 5555; leah@BandSChamber.com or drop in to The BASE Enterprise Centre, Railway Road, Stranorlar.Twin Towns businesses demand answers over recent traffic gridlock was last modified: July 23rd, 2018 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

New antenna for satellite centre

first_imgHartebeesthoek is located 65 kilometres north-west of Johannesburg within the World Heritage Site known as the Cradle of Humankind, just inside the provincial boundary of Gauteng. The nearest town, Krugersdorp, is 32 kilometres distant. 26 March 2009 Speaking at an inauguration event on Wednesday, CSIR chief executive Sibusiso Sibisi said the council was “now in a position to acquire additional valuable data to support national, regional and global priorities, and can remain a relevant player in the international tracking, telemetry and command field to support space launches.” The installation of the new antenna follows the installaton of a 9-metre Ku band full-motion antenna for tracking of geo-stationary satellites for international client Intelsat. The CSIR also won a bid to install a new Galileo earth station at Hartebeesthoek for the European Space Agency. The project design for this has been completed, and the installation should be completed by the end of July 2009. Imported from France, with civil engineering and construction work done locally, the R22-million antenna will enable the centre to track more earth observation satellites and increase its archive of earth observation data. South Africa’s Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has unveiled a new, state-of-the-art X-band antenna at its Satellite Applications Centre at Hartebeesthoek, north-west of Johannesburg. An immediate beneficiary of the new X-band antenna will be the CSIR’s data democracy project, which makes data available to the Southern African Development Community (SADC) region. SAinfo reporter The Satellite Applications Centre is situated in an isolated valley which affords protection from terrestrial interference. The CSIR has a long track record of collaboration with leading international space agencies and companies, which started with Nasa in the 1960s. Since 1982, more than 280 successful launch support operations have been performed, while tracking, telemetry and command supports have been provided on a continuous basis for polar orbiting and geostationary satellites. The antenna will also support the Department of Science and Technology-funded South African Earth Observation Strategy. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more