Stars Fly Mozzy Air For Malaria No More

first_imgBritish entertainment entrepreneur Simon Fuller, actor David Arquette, US Smash star Katharine McPhee, soul singer Aloe Blacc, African superstar Yvonne Chaka Chaka and the UN Secretary General’s Special Envoy for Malaria Ray Chambers, are all sharing their malaria stories in support of Malaria No More UK’s democratic awareness campaign Mozzy Air.Mozzy Air is a fictitious airline that flies to over 100 malaria destinations and features powerful stories from people from all walks of life across the UK, US and Africa affected by malaria. It is brought to life through an interactive infographic of a world map with flight paths to malarious countries.“The reason I’ve chosen to support the malaria fight, which isn’t widely known, is that malaria is a special cause for me for lots of reasons,” shared Simon Fuller. “Firstly, my Dad was an RAF pilot in the Second World War and, during a spell working in Burma, he sadly contracted malaria. It was the type of malaria that reoccurs and so he suffered from it his whole life. That was my first introduction to malaria and just how serious it can be. Fortunately, we had the resources to get the necessary medicine and he lived to a ripe old age.The next thing that happened that introduced me to malaria in a more direct way, was when my Dad left the RAF and decided to become a teacher. Rather than working in England, he decided to teach overseas, so at the age of five I found myself living in Ghana, West Africa – a country I grew to love. It’s also a country where malaria affects the entire population, all 24 million people are at risk.“So at the age of five I was given this little white pill, to help prevent malaria, which my Mum used to put into chocolates because it tasted really bad. I took this pill every day for five years. It was also my job to spray the house every day with the mosquito spray to keep the mosquitoes at bay, and so malaria really has been quite a significant part of my life. Some of my fondest memories are of my childhood in Ghana. I truly love that country and have been back many times. I’m proud when I see the work that is being achieved in Ghana and across Africa thanks to many organisations including Malaria No More UK. Ghana has become a shining light in the battle against malaria and with our help, long may it continue. So that’s my story”.Mozzy Air aims to raise mass awareness about the impact and scale of malaria which today affects around half of the world’s population. It also encourages British travellers to get protected before heading overseas and asks people to interact by ‘sharing their own story’ on malaria. Personal stories are a compelling way to increase understanding about malaria, a preventable disease that claims the life of a child every minute. “I’ll never forget my recent trip to Senegal with Malaria No More where I met a guy named El Hadj.,” said David Arquette. “He’d lost his 11-year old daughter to malaria, and made it his life’s goal that no other parent would have to suffer the same loss that he did. He’s since gone around to his village and 66 villages in the surrounding area and they’ve reduced the rate of malaria down from 3,500 deaths last year to almost non-existent. I was humbled and inspired by all I saw.”“I journeyed with Malaria No More to see the primary school I built in Burkina Faso, West Africa where malaria is the main reason children miss school,” adds Katharine McPhee. “I left incredibly touched by the fact that something as simple as a mosquito net transforms the life of a baby, student, headmistress, or a new mother.”Aloe Blacc says: “I had an eye-opening trip earlier this year, leaving my home in the US to visit Ghana with Malaria No More UK. I wanted to learn all I could about malaria and see its day-to-day impact on people’s lives and the country at large. We had an unforgettable visit to a primary school where I asked a classroom full of children: “Who has been affected by malaria?” Every single child raised their hand. The scale of the disease was jaw dropping”.To help drive the campaign, British fashion brand and Malaria No More UK supporter Jack Wills have provided an incentive: those who share their story are entered into a draw to win a £50 Jack Wills voucher and Malaria No More bracelet – a unisex bracelet currently sold by Jack Wills that is handcrafted in Africa to help save lives from malaria. Four of these prizes will be given away during the campaign.Mozzy Air has already reached over two million people on Twitter and offers the chance to check in to a flight by using #MozzyAir on Twitter. It has also been promoted on facebook by famous faces including Malaria No More UK Leadership Council Member Andy Murray, whose post read: “I get to travel a lot and this brought a smile to my face: Mozzy Air is a spoof airline from Malaria No More UK. A fun concept with an important message: make sure you know how to protect yourself from malaria, especially if you’re planning to travel…”Arabella Gilchrist, Communications Director for Malaria No More UK says: “We are inspired by and grateful to everyone who has shared their story so far. We have received a wealth of eclectic personal accounts – each one is a testimony of the human impact caused by malaria and inspires support for our cause. We hope the latest experiences shared through Mozzy Air will fuel further story submissions to help us raise vital awareness to save lives from malaria”.last_img read more

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BAHAMAS Prime Minister Minnis Back from CARICOM

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, March 4, 2018 – Nassau  – Prime Minister, Dr. the Hon. Hubert Minnis (centre) returned to Nassau on Monday, from CARICOM in Port-au-Prince late yesterday evening.  He’s pictured at LPIA chatting with Commissioner of Police Anthony Ferguson and Office of the Prime Minister Permanent Secretary Jack Thompson.(BIS Photo/Peter Ramsay) Related Items:last_img

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95 million earmarked for Plaza De Panama and other Balboa Park improvements

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter May 6, 2019 Ed Lenderman, Posted: May 6, 2019 Ed Lenderman center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A call today for Mayor Faulconer and the City Council to keep the money earmarked for the failed Balboa Park Plaza de Panama Project in the FY-20 budget anyway– because it’s still needed for Park improvements.Gathered in front of a stand-alone public restroom in the Palisades Section of the Park, right by the Air and Space and Automotive Museums, city, civic and cultural leaders, including 3rd District Council Member Chris Ward, said  Mayor Faulconer and the rest of the Council need to appreciate that although the Plaza de Panama Project is dead, the $9.5M dollars for it in the FY-20 proposed budget needs to stay right where it is– i.e.: Balboa Park.Ward:  “The point of today’s press conference is, and the work we’re advocating for the City Council is to make sure we retain that money in Balboa Park for other capital improvement needs.”KUSI has done a number of stories recently on the major improvements needed for the Park’s aging buildings and that the philanthropy of organizations like Friends of the Park is only going to go so far.A perfect example said the people gathered in the rain, of the failure of the City to contribute the money needed to keep San Diego’s Crown Jewel looking reasonably well, as opposed to pristine, is the deplorable conditions of the Park’s bathrooms. Yes, the museums and other attractions, including the Starlight Bowl, are in need of major upgrades, but attention must be called to something as basic as a dilapidated bathroom.The Mayor’s updated numbers for the FY-20 budget come out next week and  everybody at the gathering said we’ll know a lot more then. A public restroom in Balboa Park in deplorable condition, City, civic a nd cultural leaders calling on the Mayor and Council to keep money earmarked for failed Plaza de Panama project in the FY 20 budget dedicated to improvements here, including something as basic as restrooms pic.twitter.com/aZDKK9sCYc— Ed Lenderman (@EdLendermanKUSI) May 6, 2019 $9.5 million earmarked for ‘Plaza De Panama’ and other Balboa Park improvements in 2020 budgetlast_img read more

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Towns Current Bidding Contract Opportunities

WILMINGTON, MA — The Town’s Purchasing Department currently has the following bidding and contract opportunities available:Request For Proposals/QualificationsRecreation Trip: Northeast Historical Tour 2019 — Deadline: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 at 2:30pmInvitations To BidReplacement of Fence at Palmer Park — Deadline: Tuesday, June 5, 2018 @ 10:00amAll interested parties must first complete the town’s Bid Registration Form.Visit the Town’s Purchasing Department website for additional information. Contact Wendy Martiniello at wmartiniello[at]wilmingtonma.gov with questions.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email [email protected] this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedTown’s Current Bidding & Contract OpportunitiesIn “Government”Town’s Current Bidding & Contract OpportunitiesIn “Government”Town’s Current Bidding & Contract OpportunitiesIn “Government” read more

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Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

first_imgThe answer, of course, is that it depends on the system. In principle, stable orbits should be possible for planets that are always much closer to one star than the other. But the devil is in the details — if scientists are going to spend valuable telescope time on binary stars, they need to know what they’re looking for. How close can two stars be to each other and still form planets? And even if planets form, can their orbits remain stable over billions of years? A small collaboration of scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center (Elisa Quintana, Jack Lissauer), University of Michigan (Fred Adams), and the Carnegie Institution of Washington (John Chambers) has taken steps to answer these questions. Modern telescopes can measure the orbital parameters of binary stars quite accurately, so it makes sense to first ask what kinds of star systems will preserve the innermost region of the protoplanetary disk. The simulations of Quintana and her colleagues are fairly straightforward. After choosing the masses and orbital parameters of the two stars, 140 planetesimals (mass = 1% Mearth) and planetary embryos (mass = 10% Mearth) are arranged around one of the stars so that their overall mass distribution resembles that of a protoplanetary disk. “The disk is modeled after the Solar nebula,” Quintana explains, “we’re comparing the planet formation process in these binaries to models of the Solar System.” In other words, they are trying to find out what our Solar system might have looked like if the Sun were a binary star.The simulation calculates the force of gravity between every pair of objects and adjusts their positions accordingly at one-week intervals. When two objects collide, if their speeds are not too high, they stick together into a body of greater mass. Eventually, the system forms a handful of stable, massive planets similar to the inner solar system.”Each simulation takes approximately 3 – 4 weeks.” Quintana tells PhysOrg.com. “This corresponds to 100 – 200 million years of simulated time.” Dr. Quintana goes on the explain that this is actually rather short, because many planetesimals are thrown out of the disk or into the central star as the simulation progresses. “The same disk of 154 bodies around the Sun, without any giant planets or a stellar companion [to eject particles], takes twice as long.” To explore a wide variety of possible binary star systems and obtain statistically significant results, Quintana and her colleagues performed over a hundred of these simulations — that’s several years of computer time! All of their simulations form at least one planet, an encouraging result. It turns out that the most important factor is the companion star’s periastron, or point of closest approach to the star with the disk. A companion that gets as close as the orbit of Saturn (about 10 times farther than the Earth from the Sun) removes very little material from the inner disk, and even speeds up the process of planet formation by nudging the planetesimals into different orbits from time to time. A companion star that gets as close as Jupiter (about 5 times farther than the Earth from the Sun), however, will limit planet formation to the hottest central regions.“Over half of the binaries [in astronomical surveys] are wide enough to allow planet formation in the habitable zone of solar-type stars.” Quintana concludes. That fraction expands the catalogue of interesting stars significantly, but many possibilities remain unexplored.For example, it is entirely possible for compact binary systems to share a protoplanetary disk; the planetesimals would just orbit both stars at once. And there is no reason for just one of the stars to have planets! Another open question in whether icy planetesimals, which normally form beyond 5 AU, can still reach the inner disk to deliver water to the rocky worlds. “It is more difficult,” Quintana admits, “but there are many scenarios for having habitable planets in binary star systems.” Most of the disk is not treated in these simulations, and there could be plenty of room around or between the two stars for comets and even gas giants to form. The water will probably still be available, but it is too soon to estimate how much of it might reach these worlds.Physical simulations of planet formation have the potential to answer these questions and more. By the time Kepler and CoRoT start detecting Earth-like worlds, this line of research should have given us a good idea what to expect.Citation: “Terrestrial Planet Formation Around Individual Stars Within Binary Star Systems” by Elisa Quintana, Fred Adams, Jack Lissauer, and John Chambers, Astrophysical Journal (in press) 2007. Available online at arXiv.orgBy Ben Mathiesen, Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.Dr. Ben Mathiesen teaches physics at the American University of Paris. His agency Physical Science Editing helps scientists around the world achieve native English writing standards in their publications. Each circle in these plots represents a single simulated planet. The horizontal axis gives the radius of its orbit in astronomical units (AU; the Earth’s distance from the Sun), and the vertical axis gives the eccentricity of the orbit (zero is a perfect circle). The filled green circles represent our own rocky planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. The grey band indicates the solar system´s habitable zone. The lower plot shows planets from simulations where the point of closest approach between the stars is 10 AU (approximately equal to Saturn’s distance from the Sun). The inner disk has not been compromised; many planets form in and around the habitable zone. In the upper plot the companion star cuts this distance in half, and planet formation in the habitable zone is no longer likely. Scientific interest in the physics of planet formation is at an all-time high. Astronomers and physicists have reached a consensus on the underlying theory, or at least its outlines. A star is born from an immense cloud of gas and dust, which slowly contracts and heats up through the action of gravity. Some of the cloud falls towards the center, where it collects into a hot, dense ball of gas that will eventually become the star. The rest of the cloud orbits the center, contracting and flattening into a protoplanetary disk. Tiny grains of rock and ice stick to each other as they orbit within the disk, eventually growing into ‘planetesimals’ — small lumps of rock and ice similar to asteroids and comets. At this point gravity speeds up the process of planet formation considerably. Rocky planets form close to the newborn star, where the radiant heat prevents ice from forming. Icy planets form in the cold outer regions, but are much larger to begin with and quickly transform into gas giants. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The list of confirmed extrasolar planets keeps growing, and has now passed two hundred members — almost all of which are gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn. But the hunt is on for Earth-like worlds! With the successful launch of France’s CoRoT satellite (December 27, 2006) and the promise of NASA’s Kepler mission (due to be launched October 2008), the next five years should see the detection of numerous terrestrial planets around distant stars. But which stars should these telescopes be pointed at? Recent research has shown that these planets are probably quite common, and can even form in binary star systems. Explore further Citation: Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems (2007, January 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-01-terrestrial-planet-formation-binary-star.html Ploonets: Exiled moons may explain astronomical mysteries It is now thought that almost all stars are born with a protoplanetary disk — the question is under what circumstances these disks form useful planets rather than a mass of rubble. The method of choice is numerical simulations, which can follow the evolution of a disk by modeling its gas dynamics (in the early stages of planet formation) or the gravitational interactions between planetesimals (in the later stages). Such research has shown that planets should almost always form, at least around an isolated star like our Sun.Of course, star formation is a more complicated business.Stars rarely, if ever, form in isolation. More often, a giant molecular cloud will create dozens or hundreds of stars in relatively close proximity. Binary star systems, composed of two stars orbiting their mutual center of gravity, are actually just as common as singles. For stars the size of our Sun, about 50% form in binary systems.In the search for other worlds like our own, should we limit ourselves to stars like our own? Must we cut the field in half before we start looking? Might binary stars harbor Earth-like planets as well? last_img read more

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