Mardi Gras a ‘perfect storm’ for virus spread in New Orleans

first_imgLouisiana reported its first case of coronavirus on March 9, about two weeks after Mardi Gras culminated with its final street parades on February 25.The southern US state now has 2,305 confirmed cases and 83 deaths. New Orleans alone accounts for 997 of the cases and 46 of the deaths. ‘Hand grenade’ Arnold said New Orleans residents have largely been abiding by the stay-at-home orders.”It’s pretty empty,” he said.Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards has issued stark warnings about the ability of the state’s hospitals to deal with the expected numbers of coronavirus patients.He said the trajectory of the growth in cases is similar to that of Italy and Spain, the worst-hit countries in Europe, and demand for hospital beds and ventilators could outstrip capacity by early April.Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the shutdown in New Orleans probably should have come earlier.”It is likely that should’ve been done a little bit sooner,” Fauci told CNN. “I’m not blaming anyone on that.”It putters along and you think you’re OK,” he said. “Then it starts to go up a little and ‘Bingo,’ it goes up in an exponential way.”That’s what’s happening in New Orleans now.”Among those who have contracted coronavirus in Louisiana is Sean Payton, coach of the 2010 Super Bowl champion New Orleans Saints.Payton, who has since recovered, took to local radio to urge New Orleans residents to practice “social distancing.”””Just picture everyone’s got a hand grenade on them,” he said. “How about that? So stay away from everybody.”Payton was also confident New Orleans would recover.”This city’s tough and resilient,” he said. “We’ve been through so much.” New Orleans, the Louisiana city known as the “Big Easy” famed for its jazz and nightlife, has become an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic gripping the United States.Bourbon Street, the normally bustling heart of the French Quarter, is eerily quiet, its music silenced and its bars and restaurants shuttered.Health experts and state officials believe it is the month-long street party in February known as Mardi Gras which contributed to the severity of the outbreak in the city of some 400,000 people on the Mississippi River. Topics :center_img “Mardi Gras was the perfect storm for the spread of this virus,” said Rebekah Gee, Louisiana’s former health secretary.”Not only did we have people in floats, people in parties, but people from all over the world came here,” Gee told the MSNBC network.”Unfortunately, people were throwing beads, sharing drinks,” she said of the tradition of revelers on floats tossing necklaces of plastic beads to crowds packing the streets.”And they weren’t only throwing beads, they were likely throwing COVID-19,” Gee said. ‘Disaster that defines our generation’ “This is going to be the disaster that defines our generation,” said Collin Arnold, director of the Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness for New Orleans, which was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.Arnold agreed that Mardi Gras was probably responsible for the fact that the number of virus cases in Louisiana is rising at a rate higher than anywhere else in the country.”We had over a million and a half people in the city, including international visitors, all attending parades daily,” he told CNN.State authorities ordered the closure of bars and restaurants several days after the first cases appeared but the damage had already been done.On March 15, a Saturday night, after the order was given, it took police coming out in force to get reluctant crowds off the streets.Video footage taken that evening shows a convoy of police cars driving slowly down Bourbon Street with their blue rooftop lights flashing and their sirens blaring.”By order of the governor and the mayor, large groups of people are prohibited from congregating together,” a police officer said over a loudspeaker.”Your actions are jeopardizing public health,” the officer said. “We are directing you to clear the streets and go back to home or back to your hotel.”Thank you for your cooperation.”last_img read more

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Alvin Boggs September 20, 1937 – January 20, 2020

first_imgAlvin Boggs, age 82 of Brookville, Indiana passed away Monday, January 20, 2020 at Hospice of Cincinnati in Hamilton, Ohio. Born September 20, 1937 in Lynch, Kentucky the son of Charlie and Mattie (Sandlin) Boggs.Alvin a graduate of Taylor High School married Margaret Holman July 20, 1971 in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. Alvin worked for Cincinnati Gas and Electric (CG&E) as a Field Supervisor for many years and was a member of Trinity Christian Center in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.Alvin is survived by his wife Margaret Boggs, children Oscar (Deborah) Oakley, Gail Brown, Curt Boggs, Carol (Kurt) Jauch, Todd Boggs and Melody (Curt) Philhower. Grandpa of 12 and great grandpa of 26.Alvin is preceded in death by his parents Charlie and Mattie Boggs and son Troy Boggs.Visitation will be held Thursday, January 23, 2020 from 11:00 A.M. until time of funeral services at 1:00 P.M. with Pastor Corey Potts officiating all at Jackman Hensley Funeral Home 215 Broadway Street Harrison, Ohio 45030. Burial will follow at Glen Haven Cemetery in Harrison, Ohio.Memorials may be directed to American Cancer Society c/o the funeral home.last_img read more

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Township To Take A Longer Look At Shuttered Historic House

first_imgBy John BurtonMIDDLETOWN – Can the MacLeod Rice House be saved? And should it?That’s what township officials hope to find out as they seek requests for proposals from architectural historians to prepare a conditions assessment report on the township-owned structure.The report is to, “go through the building in a determined way to give us the sense of how much it would cost if someone would try to restore the building and make it useful again,” explained Township Administrator Anthony Mercantante, “to give us a sense of what it would really cost.”“Most people seem to have an affection for it to be saved one of these days and restored,” Mercantante said. But that requires taking “a good hard look at it and seeing what that would entail, what it would really cost.”The distinctive MacLeod Rice House is part of the Croydon Hall complex, 900 Leonardville Road, in the township’s Leonardo section. The building, according to Mercantante, has been deteriorating for a number of years and was deemed unsafe a few years ago. The township moved those using the building to other locations.The Middletown Township Historical Society and township Municipal Alliance to Prevent Alcoholism and Drug Abuse had been using the building’s office space. The Bulldog Youth Athletic Association, or BYAA, had been using part of the building for its wrestling program, according to Mercantante.As part of the request for proposal, Mercantante added, officials would like whoever received the contract to investigate whether the site could possibly qualify for the state and/or national Register of Historic Places.Making either or both of those lists would indicate the location has some historic significance.And it does, maintained Randall Gabrielan, Monmouth County historian and vice chairman of the Monmouth County Historical Commission. One of the location’s defining historical roles involves one of its former owners, Melvin Rice, and his friendship to then governor and future U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, who, according to Gabrielan, had actually visited Rice and stayed at the home. “It’s an association that may well provide eligibility to the national register,” Gabrielan suspected. The MacLeod Rice House was built in 1894 in the Queen Anne architectural style popular in the Victorian age. It was intended as the summer residence for Donald MacLeod, a successful New York City businessman, an importer of linens, in the Gilded Age, according to Gabrielan. Upon MacLeod’s death the building became home to his widow, Harriet, who eventually married Melvin Rice, MacLeod’s former employee – with whispers at the time suspecting Rice of having an affair with Harriet while she was still married to MacLeod, Gabrielan offered as a little piece of historical gossip.Rice, circa 1910, remodeled the building, adopting a more classical revival architectural style, that the structure has to this day.Rice died in 1924 and Harriet continued to live in the house until selling it to John Carr in the mid-1940s. Carr used the building as a residence. He established a boys’ boarding school, using the building and others constructed on the grounds. Croydon Hall, as the school was called, catered to the scions of wealthy families. Carr, according to Gabrielan, ran the school with middling success until closing it in 1975.Mercantante said the township acquired the entire location in 1977 and had used that building and accompanying structures for various municipal offices.Gabrielan charged the building was falling into disrepair. “The building was long neglected,” he said. And while there were places in the building that were in questionable condition, the portion of the building the historical society had been using “was a solid as a rock,” he said. Gabrielan has not revisited the building for several years.The Township Committee has the right to reject any or all proposals and has up to 60 days to award the contract, if it decides to move for ward.Even if the plan proceeds, those interested shouldn’t expect a quick fix for the building. “It’s going to take time,” Mercantante said. “It probably would be a phased project over many years, if it was decided at all that it’s worthwhile doing.”last_img read more

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Geocaching Quick Quiz: Geocache or Log?

first_imgDid you guess right?For a look behind the scenes at more creative geocache containers and ideas, visit Shop Geocaching and check out the Creative Geocaches video below. What is the most camouflaged geocache container you’ve come across? Tell us about it in the comments.Share with your Friends:More To reveal the answers…Just.Scroll.Down.… It’s a question geocachers face almost everyday on the geocaching trail, is that a geocache or log? Check out the image below of three logs and a stick. Do you best geocaching detective work. Can you crack the case?Logs or geocaches?? You’re.Almost.There.The answers revealed! Are you a geocaching cache detecting superstar? SharePrint RelatedGeocaching Quick Quiz: Name that LingoNovember 14, 2013In “7 Souvenirs of August”A Geocaching Beginner’s Guide – Geocache Container PicturesJanuary 26, 2013In “Française”Sometimes Geocaching Makes You Go… — Nuts (GC41D4C) — Geocache of the WeekOctober 10, 2013In “Community”last_img read more

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Green Building Priority #2 — Reduce Water Use

first_imgWater is such a high priority in part because so much else depends on it. Most of our power plants draw water from rivers and lakes for cooling, and during severe droughts power plants have to shut down. (In 2007 one nuclear plant in Alabama had to shut down for lack of water.) Our food system depends on irrigation—though the U.S. is less dependent on irrigation than China, India, and many other countries. We drink and wash with water. And it takes a lot of water to generate electricity: on average 2.0 gallons per kilowatt-hour in the U.S.In addition, water is energy-intensive. Pumping water out of the ground, moving it from one place to another, treating it, and then treating the wastewater after we use it accounts for about 4% of the nation’s electricity. In many municipalities, water and wastewater infrastructure comprises the single largest use of electricity.There are lots of good ways to reduce water use. A few of my favorites are listed here:Replace showerheadsOne of the easiest, least expensive strategies for reducing water use is to replace older showerheads with models that use significantly less water. Some older showerheads use 5 gallons per minute (gpm) or more, while models sold (legally) since 1994 use no more than 2.5 gpm. I’ve been using a Delta H2Okinetic 1.5 gpm showerhead for years and find it highly satisfactory, even with the low water pressure on my rural water system. Saving water with a showerhead also saves energy—because it’s heated water that you’re using less of.Replace toiletsIf you have a pre-1994 toilet (one that doesn’t list the water consumption on it), chances are pretty good that it’s using at least 3.5 gallons per flush (gpf). Since 1994, all toilets sold in the U.S. have had to use 1.6 gpf or less. More recently WaterSense-certified “high-efficiency toilets” (HETs) have been introduced that use no more than 1.28 gpm and meet various flush performance standards defined by the EPA WaterSense program. Unless your house has very long drainline runs (over 20 feet) with very low slope (nearly horizontal), choose WaterSense HET toilets.Reduce the water consumption of bathroom faucetsMore and more new lavatory faucets today meet the WaterSense limit of 1.5 gpf, while most faucets in use deliver far more water. Since 1994, faucets could use no more than 2.2 gpm (at 60 psi water pressure), but older faucets often use a lot more. Most relatively modern faucets can be retrofit with screw-in low-flow aerators. You can go as low as 0.5 gpm, which is usually plenty for brushing teeth, washing hands and face, and shaving. Note that the lower the flow, the longer it will take hot water to reach the tap.Install an on-demand circulator pumpTo avoid wasting water as you wait for hot water to reach your bathroom or kitchen, you can install an on-demand recirculation system. Unlike continuous-circulation systems that are used in hotels, on-demand systems are activated by a user. Several companies make these systems, most using D’MAND technology licensed by ACT Metlund.Buy a water-saving clothes washerHorizontal-axis, front-loading clothes washers use significantly less water than most vertical-axis top-loaders. They also use half the detergent, and most of them wring more moisture out during the spin cycle (saving energy needed for drying). If you’re replacing a clothes washer or buying your first, look for a water-saving front-loader.Buy a water-conserving dishwasherCheck the energy- and water-efficiency of available dishwashers if you’re in the market for a new one. The Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) has the best information.Plant low-water-use landscapingIn many parts of the country, outdoor water use exceeds indoor use. Native landscaping that does not require irrigation can save a tremendous amount of water, compared with lawns and most other conventional landscaping. The term “xeriscaping” is sometimes used to describe this landscaping practice.Harvest rainwater for irrigatingIf you must irrigate, capture rainwater and use that for irrigating. You can install a simple rainbarrel that sits under a downspout at the corner of your house, or install a more sophisticated system with greater storage capacity.These suggestions are just a starting point; there are lots of other opportunities for savings. Huge savings can also be achieved simply by changing your behavior: taking shorter showers, and not running the water when washing dishes or brushing your teeth, and skipping lawn-watering, for example. To a significant extent, water savings is about common sense.My top-10 list of green building priorities so far:#2. Reduce water use#3. Ensure a healthy indoor environment#4. Reduce the need for driving#5. Build smaller and optimize materials use#6. Ensure durability and reuse existing buildings#7. Protect and restore the site#8. Use green materials#9. Create resilient, climate-adapted buildings#10. Make it easy for homeowners to be green In addition to this Energy Solutions blog, Alex writes the weekly blog Alex’s Cool Product of the Week, which profiles an interesting new green building product each week. You can sign up to receive notices of these blogs by e-mail—enter your e-mail address in the upper right corner of any blog page.Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. RELATED ARTICLES Resilient Design: Water in a Drought-Prone EraSaving Energy by Saving WaterAll About Washing MachinesAll About Dishwashers Can Swimming Pools Be Green?The Uncertain Future of Phoenix and Las VegasWater, Water EverywhereIn the West, Drought Ends ‘Era of the Lawn’The DOE Showerhead RuleGBA Encyclopedia: Green Irrigation Reducing water consumption should be a high priority not only in the parched Southwest but throughout the country. Some argue, in fact, that water is going to be an even bigger challenge than energy over the coming decades.In the United States, nowhere is the focus on water greater today than in the Colorado River Basin. A series of reservoirs on the Colorado, including Lake Powell and Lake Mead, provide water for some 25 million Americans, and allocations of water from the river exceed the available flow. Lake Mead currently stands at half-full, its scenic shore marred by a giant bathtub ring several hundred feet high. A university study a few years ago said there was a 50% chance that the reservoir would be functionally empty (its level too low to draw from) by 2021!But in many ways, water resource issues are an even bigger problem in parts of the country that aren’t as used to thinking about water. In the fall of 2007, Atlanta came within 30 days of running out of water, with no provisions for what to do if that occurred. Eastern reservoirs tend to be a lot shallower than western reservoirs, so have less storage capacity.last_img read more

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Cricketers to get fatter pay cheques

first_imgIndia’s rich cricketers are set to get wealthier with a new BCCI contract coming their way.  Grade A cricketers such as Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, VVS Laxman, Harbhajan Singh and Rahul Dravid stand to get a 60 per cent hike in their annual payments. Their new pay packet will be Rs 1 crore.Grade B and Grade C players will get Rs 50 lakh and Rs 25 lakh per year respectively – an increase of 25 per cent. The BCCI has done away with Grade D. The board has made playing Tests more lucrative. In each Test match, a player will earn Rs 7 lakh – more than double the current pay of Rs 3 lakh. The decision looks like a reward for India’s continuing No. 1 Test status. The ODI fee too has been increased, but relatively less. Every ODI will now fetch players Rs 4 lakh as against Rs 2.5 lakh earlier. For T20s, the players will be paid Rs 2 lakh.  The board has also redrawn the groups. Group ASachin TendulkarMS DhoniGautam GambhirVirender SehwagRahul DravidVVS LaxmanSuresh RainaHarbhajan Singh Zaheer Khan Group B Yuvraj SinghIshant SharmaAshish NehraPraveen KumarVirat KohliM VijayPragyan Ojha Group C S SreesanthAmit MishraR AshwinRohit SharmaCheteshwar PujaraRavindra JadejaAbhimanyu MithunVinay Kumarlast_img read more

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GJM goes on poster cleaning crusade after polls in bid to make Hills clean again

first_imgDarjeeling: With the polls having ended, the Gorkha Janmukti Morcha has taken up the onus of cleaning up all campaigning material from the Hills.”Polls are over. It’s time to clean up the town. The youth organisation of the GJM will be cleaning Darjeeling, Kurseong, Kalimpong and Mirik. Our units will clean up the GTA area constituency-wise. We will remove the posters, banners and other campaign material. We also request other political parties to do the same,” stated Sanjiv Mothay, general secretary, Town Committee, Gorkha Janmukti Yuva Morcha. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaMembers of the Yuva Morcha went around town on Monday, removing campaign posters, banners and flexes. The campaign was flagged off from Chowk Bazaar in Darjeeling. Anit Thapa, general secretary, GJM (Binay faction) had made a similar appeal on Sunday. In his appeal, Thapa, who is also the present chairman, Board of Administrators, GTA, stated: “One of the main issues that we fought elections on this time is to make the Hills beautiful, along with reviving the lost glory. In order to once again make Darjeeling the Queen of the Hills, we have to bring about a change in the mindset of the residents. We have to take care of our Hills and make her beautiful. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayWe have to unite to make her clean and green. A step in this direction would be to remove all the campaign material as the polls are over. We appeal to other political outfits to do the same.”With tourists thronging the Hills, clean and green is what should be presented, feels the GJM. The Opposition parties have hailed the move as well. “We welcome the move and we are also ready to pitch in,” stated Ajoy Edward, member, steering committee, GNLF.last_img read more

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Dear NFL Kickers Will Not Be Stopped

Did you hear about the NFL’s incredible new rule? On a point-after try, a defense will be able to score a 1-point safety by stopping the attempting team in its own end zone. Oh, and the new rule also moved the line of scrimmage for an extra point to the 15-yard line, making it the equivalent of a 33-yard field goal attempt.But indulge me for two seconds and let’s talk about this 1-point safety, a totally new thing in the NFL. Sure, it’s something that probably won’t come up very often – or, you know, ever. This new safety would occur if the offensive team fumbled the ball backwards, then the players kept knocking it backwards because of their gigantic butter-fingers until an offensive player finally recovered it in his own end zone (yes, on the other end of the field), where they were immediately tackled. (The offense can also score a 1-point safety, but that’s boring.) This opens up the tantalizing possibility of game scores traditionally reserved for baseball, soccer, or curling, like 6-1 (if the only points scored are a touchdown and a defensive point after safety) or 10-1 (if the only points scored are a touchdown, a defensive point-after safety, and two regular safeties).OK, thanks. Back to the longer extra point: The theory is that the league wants to make the play more exciting by making it less “automatic,” and perhaps by encouraging teams to go for two points more often. They’re unlikely to be very successful on either count.Kickers now convert extra points more than 99 percent of the time. That will almost certainly drop, but not by very much. It has been bandied about that kickers have made “only” 91.6 percent of attempts from this distance in the last 10 years. But 10 years is an eternity for kickers – they’re a whole lot better now than they were in 2005. As noted by Kevin Seifert, kickers have made 94.4 percent of field goals from this new distance over the last three years, and 96.7 percent last year. And that doesn’t account for the point-after kicks being slightly easier than their field goal counterparts: They’re never rushed for time, and they’re always taken from the center of the field (technically from wherever the kicker prefers). According to Pro Football Focus, kickers have made 97.6 percent of attempts taken from 30-35 yards from the dead-center of the field over the past three years.When I wrote about kickers in January I developed an era-sensitive model for kickers that at least partially accounts for hash marks (and, if I may, is scary accurate). It’s slightly more conservative than that Pro Football Focus mark, but predicts that kickers would make 96.4 percent of 33-yard kicks next year, rising to about 98 percent over the next 10 years.This isn’t the first time the NFL has been uncomfortable with how good kickers have gotten at their jobs. In 1974, the league moved the goal posts to the back of the end zone, effectively making XPs and other kicks 10 yards harder. Extra point success dropped from 98 percent the year before to 92.1 percent the year after. But it didn’t take long for kickers to recover:From an excitement standpoint, it’s tough to see a significant difference between teams making their extra points 96-98 percent of the time rather than 99. Even if misses happen slightly more often, they’re still going to be infrequent enough that I’d guess they’re more likely to annoy fans after the fact than keep them in suspense beforehand.And while this should marginally improve the math in favor of 2-point attempts, it’s not nearly dramatic enough to make going for two points the obviously better option. (It would have been if the NFL had also moved the line of scrimmage on 2-point attempts up to the 1-yard line, per the Eagles proposal.) Defenses will also be able to score two points on the play by returning a fumble, interception or blocked kick for a “touchdown,” as is the rule in college.And coaches are already pretty irrational about going for two. They have been converted about 47.4 percent of the time over the past 10 years, which would be enough to make them roughly the equivalent of kicking extra points (from an expected-value perspective; though that number may be low because teams that make 2-point attempts tend to be slightly worse than average). At the very least, the expected value of going for it versus kicking is so close that the decision should be dominated by the tactical situation (such as how far ahead or behind they are, and whether they should be playing it safe or trying to gamble) and how good the teams are in short yardage situations. But coaches still basically only make the 2-point attempt when they’re required to.If there is a big shift in favor of going for two, I think it’s more likely to be a result of coaches deciding the new rule gives them cover for it, rather than a large and fundamental shift in the math. And there’s precedent for this: The all-time high for successful 2-point attempts made was 59, set in 1994 – the year the play was first introduced. read more

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Losing An NCAA Tournament Game From Every Seed Isnt Easy But These

✓ Some early exits were more predictable than othersMen’s college basketball teams with at least eight losses in their opening games, including the First Four and round of 64, in the NCAA Tournament, 1985-2017 ✓✓✓✓ Source: sports-reference.com Arizona1155– ✓✓✓✓✓✓6 ✓✓ Missouri1050– Murray State100 Pennsylvania Utah State90 ✓✓✓✓ Valparaiso80 VCU 6 6 ✓ ✓ Louisiana State850– Temple933– ✓✓✓✓✓6 Arizona✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Vanderbilt Oklahoma956– La. State ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Missouri✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Xavier922– School12345678910111213141516Total ✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓ East Tenn. State80 8 ✓✓✓✓✓✓ Pennsylvania110 SchoolOpening-round lossesShare as better seed than opponent 6 Iona90 Iowa State✓✓ A few familiar Cinderellas have provided some of the greatest moments in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament. But every shocking upset from a ragtag mid-major also means something else: a big-name school has fallen on its face in spectacular fashion.And it seems certain big-name schools are more prone to this than others. In tournaments over the past 10 years, Georgetown has lost its opening-round game playing as a No. 3, No. 6 and No. 2 seed. Arizona won a title and made a second Final Four in the 1990s but also peppered that decade with four losses in the opening round — and in each, the Wildcats were seeded No. 5 or better.So are certain schools uniquely susceptible to March heartache? We looked back over every team’s opening-round game since the tourney expanded to 64 teams in 1985 — including the round of 64 and the play-in games known as the First Four.1The First Four got its start in 2011; play-in games between No. 16 seeds in earlier years were not included in this analysis. Some higher seeds do seem to head home early more than others — and a few of those well-known names are putting together an interesting range of losses.In the past 33 tournaments, 22 teams have made opening-round exits at least eight times.2We didn’t count round-of-64 losses that occurred after a team had won a play-in game. But most of those teams have typically been underdogs — teams that want to win, of course, but aren’t strictly supposed to. Brigham Young, for example, has lost its opening game 12 times, including once in the First Four, but never as a seed better than eighth.3The Cougars have lost as a No. 8 seed four times. Only eight of those 22 teams were seeded better than their opponent in half or more of their opening-round losses. One of those teams is Arizona, which has lost 11 times in the round of 64 and as the better seed in six of those games — most recently in 2016 as a No. 6 seed to a Wichita State team that had to win a play-in game just to be there. Missouri and Indiana have each lost 10 round-of-64 games, though only five of the Tigers’ losses came as the better seed, while the Hoosiers were the better seed in eight of their defeats. Georgia850– ✓ New Mexico ✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓ Murray State ✓✓✓✓✓ Lost when seeded … New Mexico State1118– Indiana Georgetown, however, doesn’t show up in our list of biggest opening-round losers, even though it suffered high-profile losses to Florida Gulf Coast in 2013 and Ohio in 2010. Indeed, the Hoyas have lost at the start of the tournament only two other times since 1985, as a No. 6 seed in 2011 and a No. 10 seed in 1997.But Georgetown does have something interesting in common with Arizona and Missouri, teams with high numbers of opening-round defeats. All three have lost an opening-round game as both a No. 2 and a No. 3 seed — a distinction they share with Duke, Iowa State, Michigan State and South Carolina.4Syracuse, which in 1991 became the first No. 2 to lose in the round of 64 when it fell to Richmond, is the only one of the eight teams to share that distinction that hasn’t also lost as a No. 3 seed.This got us thinking: If a team already has round-of-64 losses from two of the top three seeds, how many different seed lines could it lose from?In this day and age, it would be tough to suffer opening-round defeat from every spot on the bracket (especially considering that a No. 16 has yet to fell a No. 1). Major-conference teams are almost guaranteed a seed somewhere between 1 and 11, so they have plenty of opportunities to fail from those seed slots.5Unless a mediocre team manages to win its conference championship, à la the 2008 Georgia Bulldogs, which were seeded 14th because of their 17-16 record. And 14 through 16 seeds are almost always automatic qualifiers from smaller conferences that will have a hard time ever reaching the higher seeds without moving to a power conference or magically transforming into Gonzaga. So, a reasonable goal — if you could call it that — might be to lose from 12 different seeds, or three-fourths of those possible.It takes a special kind of program to have a diversified portfolio of early tournament losses. It has to be good enough to make the tournament often but not so good that it never loses its opener. So teams like Kansas are out: The Jayhawks have made the tournament every year but one since 19856The 1989 tourney. but have lost only two of their 32 round-of-64 matchups. (Duke is in a similar position, with only two opening-round losses other than its two highly seeded defeats.) The team also needs enough regular-season inconsistency from year to year to receive tourney bids from many different seeds — a program that’s good enough for a No. 4 seed one year but just the right amount of mediocre for a No. 10 seed the next.This merit badge of losing might not be possible; no team has reached even the three-fourths mark. These are the programs with opening-round losses from at least six different seeds: ✓✓✓ 6 6 Vanderbilt850– Nebraska ✓✓✓✓✓✓7 Davidson80 Providence ✓✓✓✓ 8 Brigham Young1331%– W. Virginia Texas875– ✓✓✓✓ Montana80 Utah State Marquette 6 Princeton Georgia 6 Princeton911– Schools that are consistently inconsistentMen’s college basketball teams that have lost in the NCAA Tournament’s First Four or round of 64 from the most seeds, 1985-2017 7 6 6 ✓ Indiana978– ✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓6 6 Source: Sports-Reference.com ✓✓ These teams are closest to running the table, but they all still have a long way to go. Iowa State has some of the hardest seeds out of the way — losing as a No. 27To Hampton in 2001. and No. 38To UAB in 2015. — but also handling the tricky 12 and 13 spots. To get to three-fourths of the seeds, all the Cyclones need to do is lose from those middle seeds of 4 through 7, 9 and 11. (For a long-suffering fan of the cardinal and gold, this feels like an attainable goal.)West Virginia is another team with a good range of losses, and unlike the Cyclones, the Mountaineers actually have a chance to add to their total this year. West Virginia is seeded fifth in the East region — a seed from which it has never lost in the round of 64. The 5-vs.-12 matchups are already ripe for upsets, as we know, so I’ll be picking Murray State to take down the Mountaineers and hand them a fresh seed loss. Like Iowa State and West Virginia, Murray State has six differently seeded opening-round losses, but one of those already came from the No. 12 seed, unfortunately. Penn also could have built on its total this year, but it’s already lost as a No. 16 seed. (And, of course, we’re hoping that the Quakers make another kind of history.)The teams on top of our loser’s bracket, Arizona and Missouri, have lost as eight different seeds, an impressive feat. Both teams have been responsible for several busted brackets, having fallen from the second, third and fourth seeds. We were hopeful that each team could add a notch to its belt this year, but the selection committee didn’t come through for us. Arizona is missing a No. 7 seed loss, but the Wildcats were too strong, securing the No. 4 seed in the South region. Missouri had more options in the middle, needing a No. 5 or a No. 7, but no such luck for the Tigers (well, really, for us) — they ended up with the No. 8 seed in the West.No team wants an early exit from the tournament. But if you’re going to lose your first game, it may as well be in a new and interesting way.Check out our latest March Madness predictions. read more

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Saturdays loss affects pride more than championship chances

The Badgers took down the top-ranked, undefeated Buckeyes in Madison, Wis. It’s happened twice since October in two sports. But let’s move on. Let’s move on from Badger fans allegedly spitting on Ohio State players, chanting homophobic slurs with Buckeyes on the free-throw line and screaming, “F— Ohio!” before the opening tip. The land’s best fans are above that. Let’s move on from the notion that somehow there’s a connection between Saturday’s loss and the Oct. 16 football game. Let’s move on because, unlike that football game, this team’s chances at a National Championship are the same now as they were on Friday. A loss in February does not break what could be a dream season in college basketball. Coach Thad Matta has continually emphasized that this team’s goal was never to go undefeated — it was to win the Big Ten Championship. The team had already moved on from an undefeated season before taking its first loss. Even with the defeat, OSU leads the conference by two games with six contests left. Four of those are at home, including the regular-season finale, a rematch against Wisconsin on March 6 in Columbus. At this point, it would take more than one loss to cost this team a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. But while Saturday’s defeat is relatively inconsequential in the big picture, it sure doesn’t feel that way, does it? Until the Buckeyes beat the Badgers, there are things that happened in the loss to Wisconsin that we can’t move on from. We can’t move on from watching a 15-point lead dissolve almost instantaneously, after a barrage of threes jet-fueled the bedlam at the Kohl Center.    We can’t move on from that unutterable feeling that churned the pits of our stomachs when we watched a guy named Mike Bruesewitz hit a game-deciding shot, when Wisconsin’s student body rushed the floor or when we couldn’t turn on the TV without seeing Jordan Taylor’s stat line that included 5-for-8 on 3-point shooting. We can’t move on from the fact that Wisconsin fans have started labeling the Badgers “Buckeye Killers.” The rate of winning that OSU has achieved in football and basketball makes losing to the same school over and over again that much worse. We wouldn’t be the fan base we are if these things didn’t bother us. It’s part of a good fan’s DNA to squirm when falling to a rival, regardless of whether the loss means anything. But the beautiful thing about sports is there’s always another opportunity. And the impact of Saturday’s result would shrink if the Buckeyes hammered the Badgers March 6 at home, like they should. “To be spit on is just nasty,” freshman forward Jared Sullinger tweeted following the game. “On top of that in my Face. Before and after the game. Smh. I just kept walking. More fuel to the fire.” Although it was tough, Sullinger did the right thing. Wisconsin will get what’s coming. Until then, let’s move on. read more

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