Watch Widespread Panic Soundcheck In Mexico For Panic En La Playa Seis

first_imgWidespread Panic fans are descending on Riviera Maya, Mexico for the sixth annual Panic En La Playa event, which officially begins with performances tonight and will run throughout the week. The gentlemen of Widespread Panic made their way to the stage last night, getting loose for what will be their first performance of 2017.Fortunately, PanicStream was on hand to capture some of the music, snapping a video of Panic’s pre-Playa soundcheck. Take a look at the action in the video below.You can find a full stream for the soundcheck here. Widespread Panic begins Panic en la Playa tonight, February 27th, through March 2nd.[Photo via Dave Vann, taken at Panic en la Playa Cinco in 2016]last_img read more

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QPR ready to rival Sunderland and Norwich for Swansea man – report

first_imgQPR are ready to rival Sunderland and Norwich for the signing of Swansea striker Danny Graham, according to the Daily Mail.Rangers boss Harry Redknapp is said to be considering making a £4m bid for the 27-year-old.Fulham could face competition from Liverpool and Everton for the signing of goalkeeper Jack Butland from Birmingham City, the Daily Telegraph suggest.Southampton are also believed to be interested in the 19-year-old, while both Merseyside clubs are said to be considering making a bid.Birmingham reportedly want at least £6m for Butland. The Daily Mail claimed earlier this week that Fulham are favourites to sign him.The Telegraph say City also want £6m for highly-rated youngster Nathan Redmond, with Fulham again among the clubs apparently interested.The Daily Mirror say Fulham are keen on Atalanta’s Argentine winger Matias Schelotto.Schelotto apparently has an EU passport so would not require a work permit to play in England.Meanwhile, Ashley Cole and Frank Lampard have again been linked with summer moves to Manchester United, this time by The Sun.It is claimed United boss Sir Alex Ferguson is ready to offer both Chelsea players 12-month contracts with the option of a further year.This page is regularly updated.YTo4OntzOjk6IndpZGdldF9pZCI7czoyMDoid3lzaWphLW5sLTEzNTI0NjE4NjkiO3M6NToibGlzdHMiO2E6MTp7aTowO3M6MToiMyI7fXM6MTA6Imxpc3RzX25hbWUiO2E6MTp7aTozO3M6MjI6Ildlc3QgTG9uZG9uIFNwb3J0IGxpc3QiO31zOjEyOiJhdXRvcmVnaXN0ZXIiO3M6MTc6Im5vdF9hdXRvX3JlZ2lzdGVyIjtzOjEyOiJsYWJlbHN3aXRoaW4iO3M6MTM6ImxhYmVsc193aXRoaW4iO3M6Njoic3VibWl0IjtzOjMzOiJTdWJzY3JpYmUgdG8gb3VyIGRhaWx5IG5ld3NsZXR0ZXIiO3M6Nzoic3VjY2VzcyI7czoyODM6IlRoYW5rIHlvdSEgUGxlYXNlIGNoZWNrIHlvdXIgaW5ib3ggaW4gb3JkZXIgdG8gY29uZmlybSB5b3VyIHN1YnNjcmlwdGlvbi4gSWYgeW91IGRvbid0IHNlZSBhbiBlLW1haWwgZnJvbSB1cywgY2hlY2sgeW91ciBzcGFtIGZvbGRlci4gSWYgeW91IHN0aWxsIGhhdmVuJ3QgcmVjZWl2ZWQgYSBjb25maXJtYXRpb24gbWVzc2FnZSwgcGxlYXNlIGUtbWFpbCBmZWVkYmFja0B3ZXN0bG9uZG9uc3BvcnQuY29tIGFuZCB0ZWxsIHVzIHlvdSB3aXNoIHRvIHN1YnNjcmliZSB0byBvdXIgbmV3c2xldHRlci4iO3M6MTI6ImN1c3RvbWZpZWxkcyI7YToxOntzOjU6ImVtYWlsIjthOjE6e3M6NToibGFiZWwiO3M6NToiRW1haWwiO319fQ== Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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The strength of South Africa’s democracy

first_imgSouth Africa’s electoral system allows the voice of the minorities to flourish. (Image: Brand South Africa)• Kate BapelaSpokespersonIndependent Electoral Commission+27 12 622 [email protected]• Elections 2014: All you need to know • Election volunteers: the beating heart of democracy • Frequently asked questions about voting in the 2014 elections • Elections 2014: A guide to all registered parties • South Africa’s 2014 elections – a resource packSulaiman PhilipOnce upon a time Thembi Nobadula was a hard-charging activist, a reform-minded firebrand, one of the optimistic leaders of the 1956 Women’s March. Today she remains the imposing African woman who fled into exile in 1962 rather than live as a second class citizen in her own country. In London she was a neighbour of Oliver and Adelaide Tambo, and she remained active in the fight to topple the apartheid government.One day, just after the advent of a free and democratic South Africa, she marched to Nelson Mandela’s office to confront him. Why, she wanted to know, was he bending over backwards to appease those who had oppressed them. “He said that the architects of apartheid were the very people that should be liberated first before anything was done because if those were not liberated then South Africa would not be free.”With that simple and elegiac guiding philosophy, South Africa began building a democracy for all of its people. Doubters were challenged as the new broom of reconciliation and the world’s most progressive constitution became law. The 19 tribes, parties and factions at the negotiations may not have dreamed of a compassionate and inclusive society, but they created a constitution that safeguards all of South Africa’s people no matter their gender, race, tribal, ethnic or sexual identity.Two storiesOften perception becomes reality. One South African’s good story is another’s fable. One group sees a failing education system; another sees a process of rehabilitation after years of neglect. Some elements of the population are convinced the government is a hotbed of cronyism and corruption and that we are all doomed to wake up one day in a banana republic; others do not hold with this.People will get upset by their leaders and their government but, as the country gets ready to go to the polls, the reality is South Africa’s democracy is stronger than it has ever been.That is not a naïve statement. South Africans have embraced democracy and heeded the words of their first democratically elected president, Nelson Mandela. At the 1993 Cosatu congress he urged them: “If the ANC does to you what the apartheid government did to you, then you must do to the ANC what you did to the apartheid government.”South Africans are weathering recent storms by doing exactly that. They are building strong grassroots movements and new political parties are being born to give voice to their frustrations. The country enjoys a raucous, scandal-seeking free press. Unrestricted NGOs have run successful and creative campaigns that have forced changes in government policy. Opposition parties consistently and without fear have a go at the ruling party.In other words, South Africans have learned the most important lesson of democracy: they have learned to criticise without fear and discovered how to turn anger into positive action.Political consultant Abdul Waheed Patel says the ANC remains a formidable opponent. With 20 years of campaign experience and a track record in government, it has definite advantages over newer parties. “It is also the party of Nelson Mandela and the movement that brought apartheid to its knees. It has a national infrastructure and a grassroots presence second to none. What is also often overlooked is that the ANC remains a broad church, where diverse communities and interest groups do find a political home and with whom the party’s policies resonate.”Many parties in the runningThat there are 33 parties contesting this election is a sign of the strength of South Africa’s democracy and not only an indication of frustration on the part of the country’s electorate. It is healthy that voters have a choice, Patel says. “Larger parties can’t afford to become complacent, and it deepens and enriches political pluralism, debate and discourse. Such healthy competition can lead to all parties raising their standards for the benefit of the citizen.”Sally Matthews, a senior lecturer in the politics department at Rhodes University, argues that the number of parties in an election is not the best way to judge the strength of a democracy. “The election cycle is a very shallow indicator of the strength of a democracy.”To truly know if South Africans are developing a deeper understanding of what democracy is you need to look beyond what is, in essence, an auction. “We have to respect the choices that voters make but our elections are still tied to our recent history. The ANC, as the party of liberation, has a legitimacy that makes it difficult for other voices and ideas to be heard. The Vote No campaign is an indication that there are people who understand that meaningful choice and the right to choose that option is part and parcel of a true democracy.”Eroded legitimacyIt is not provocative to say that there are people who feel the ANC has eroded some of that legitimacy, says Matthews, but their frustration is unlikely to change the political landscape of the country.In 2012, 18 years into the new democracy, a study by the Institute for Justice and Reconciliation found that South Africans identified themselves by their race, ethnicity or language group before they called themselves South Africans. Just 8.3% of adults identified themselves as South Africans first and that number was even lower among younger South Africans.According to Patel this is a result of South Africa’s culturally and racially engineered history. Democracy, he argues, allows people to cherish and rekindle social and religious identity within the tapestry of South African society, but this does not mean they do not identify as South African as well. “The South African government has promoted the notion of unity in diversity. However, clearly there are issues around social cohesion and what it means to be South African which the government has identified as a challenge and awoken to address.”Proportional representationSouth Africa’s electoral system makes it difficult for one party to truly dominate the political and social landscape, Matthews explains. The national proportional system, a concession to the National Party made during constitutional negotiations, makes it easier for smaller parties to win parliamentary seats. “Our system puts the ANC at a disadvantage despite its vast majority because it allows different voices to flourish. Win one percent of the vote and you get four parliamentary seats, so even if the ANC was tempted to dilute constitutionally guaranteed rights and protections, it would be difficult to win the required two thirds majority.”A decade ago the ANC was polling at 70% and whispers began among opposition parties. A ruling party enjoying such a vast majority was bad for South Africa’s fledgling democracy, they warned. The ANC answered, through then president Thabo Mbeki, that the country’s biggest challenge was not the need for a stronger opposition. It was, he wrote, whether voters would unite behind the ANC’s “people’s contract” to continue reconciliation after the abuses of apartheid.Today, the idea of a “people’s contract” is less relevant to ANC campaigns but the ideology remains firmly entrenched in the policies of the ANC as the ruling party. The government’s National Development Plan, the roadmap for the development of South African society and economy, is built on the principle of an activist society and citizen activism.Patel points out that the Constitution has been amended on more than 17 separate occasions. “The ANC has always stepped lightly when dealing with fears associated with tampering of the Constitution. The changes it has legislated, in partnership with opposition parties, have been made to advance national reconstruction, transformation and redress,” he says.“The task at hand will not be easy, but you have mandated us to change South Africa from a land in which the majority lived with little hope, to one in which they can live and work with dignity, with a sense of self-esteem and confidence in the future.” – Nelson Mandela, in his inauguration speech, 10 May 1994last_img read more

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The Wallet Revolution [Infographic]

first_imgTags:#e-commerce fredric paul Money will never be the same. The rise of e-wallets, mobile payment services and e-coupons won’t put an end to old-fashioned money – though checks are quickly becoming an endangered species. But as e-payments become safer, cheaper, easier to use and more trusted, their use is expected to skyrocket. This ReadWrite infographic offers some key data points on the path to digital money. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Infographic content by Michael Singer. Design by Richard Leeds, Images by Kate Francis.last_img read more

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Rock band names show after Kalmadi’s Diana blunder

first_imgSuresh Kalmadi’s embarrassing slip of tongue when he wrongly referred to Prince Charles as ‘Prince Diana’ today inspired rock band Pentagram to name their show at the Commonwealth Games Village after it.”We do not mean that. We are here to have fun with,” Bollywood music composer Vishal Dadlani, who is the lead singer of the band, said when asked if the theme was chosen to take a dig at Kalmadi.”We chose it (the theme) just like that. Just wanted to be notorious,” he said.Commonwealth Games Organising Committee Chairman Suresh Kalmadi had, during a press conference, wrongly referred to Prince Charles as “Prince Diana”.The Mumbai based band today enthralled audiences at the jam-packed amphitheater in the international zone of Commonwealth Games Village here by belting out some of their hit numbers.”It is really a matter of pride for us to perform here.We are very happy,” Vishal told PTI.Princess Diana, had died in a car crash in Paris in 1997.Talking of the alleged corruption related to the mega sporting event, Dadlani said “I am obviously disappointed by it. I feel, corrupt people should be hanged.””Even after the Games, we should not forget and divert our attention from the corruption. Guilty should be punished,” he said.A series of cultural events are being organised at Commonwealth Games Village here everyday.Vishal, along with Shekhar have composed music for several Bollywood movies like Jhankar Beats, Om Shanti Om, Dostana and Anjana Anjaani.last_img read more

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Cronje made a fixing offer even before Nagpur: Gibbs

first_imgFile photo of former South Africa batsman Herschelle Gibbs.Former South African batsman Herschelle Gibbs has claimed in his controversial autobiography, To the Point that former South Africa captain Hansie Cronje had made an offer to the team to fix a match in India in 1996.However, an one-time ace opener admitted that Cronje remained a man he would always admire.In a chapter titled ‘The Controversies’, Gibbs recalled the night Cronje changed the face of the game forever.”It was 6.30 a.m. and knocking on my door was the Proteas team captain Hansie Cronje. We were touring India in 2000, and in Nagpur about to play our final ODI match against India. My roommate Henry Williams was in the shower when Hansie sat down on the bed. He got straight to the point. “I’ve got a mate here in India,” he said, “and you can make some good money if you do what he’s asking. He’s offering US$15,000 if you go out for less than 20 in today’s game.”But it was not the first time that Cronje had approached his side about match-fixing, according to Gibbs.”This had happened before,” Gibbs wrote in his book which was released here on Monday.”During a tour to India in 1996, we were due to play a benefit game for one of the (unnamed) Indian players, it would be the last game of the tour. The night before the game, Hansie got the whole team together and dropped a real bombshell. “I know a guy”, he said, “who is going to give us US$250,000 if we lose this game”.advertisementGibbs said the offer was tempting because the South Africans were probably going to lose the game anyway due to the team being below strength with six members of the side being sick.”Of course the team decided against taking the bribe, but even so, it hadn’t been an immediate and strong reaction to an activity totally abhorrent to the notion of sport. Instead we talked the offer over. We declined the offer. Sachin Tendulkar ended up getting a 100 in that game and, predictably, we lost.”Gibbs said when Cronje made the offer in Nagpur, the consequences of the offer did not even enter his mind as he thought about how it might help him pay off his mother’s house.”And just like that I made a decision that would get me into a world of trouble and that I would bitterly regret.”Despite initially agreeing, Gibbs reneged on the deal but was subsequently fined and banned for six months.”The match-fixing scandal (that started in Nagpur in India) may have cuffed us together, but Hansie was a man I will always admire,” Gibbs wrote, adding that he had forgiven him long ago.”Hansie was certainly the best captain for whom I’ve ever played. Despite the cloud that hangs over his legacy…we were all in awe of the guy — Hansie was one of those men who had a special presence towards which others gravitate.”To this day, Gibbs remains uncertain of the inclusiveness of the King Commission of Enquiry which ended inconclusively after it was set up by the South African government in the wake of the match-fixing scandal: “I’m not sure whether the King Commission managed to uncover everything.”Although Gibbs is confident of there being no match-fixing talk in any South Africa side he has played in since the Cronje scandal, he is not certain about other teams, especially after the recent debacle with the Pakistani team on their London tour: “I’ve watched a couple of games on the subcontinent and I’ve had my suspicions.”But I obviously can’t be sure. One thing I do know for sure, and that is, it is impossible to fix a game without 90 per cent of the team in on the deal.”- With PTI inputslast_img read more

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Over 100 varieties of tomato to go on sale for TomatoMania

first_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsKUSI’s Allie Wagner was live at the Water Conservation Garden in El Cajon where over 100 varieties of tomato will go on sale for TomatoMania. Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: March 7, 2018 Allie Wagner, Allie Wagner March 7, 2018 Over 100 varieties of tomato to go on sale for TomatoManialast_img read more

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