USA: Battelle, Levant Power Corporation Plan to Develop Ocean Power Harvesters

first_img View post tag: Naval View post tag: Corporation View post tag: News by topic Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Battelle, Levant Power Corporation Plan to Develop Ocean Power Harvesters Battelle and Levant Power Corporation jointly announced today the two companies plan to develop and commercialize wave energy harvesting technology for ocean systems.  Providing consistent, uninterrupted power to sensors, vehicles and communications systems for ocean borne-devices is an industry-wide challenge. Battelle and Levant say that challenge can be overcome by OceanGen power units which could facilitate expansive deployment of advanced and innovative ocean-borne devices.“The Navy and commercial markets have identified the delivery of new sources of underwater power as critical over the next decade,” said Steve Kelly, President of Battelle’s National Security Global Business.  “The commercialization and deployment of OceanGen will herald a new era of advanced sensors and real-time awareness across a broad spectrum of applications.” The first two phases of the program will involve development and a technology demonstration. Levant and Battelle plan to jointly manufacture the OceanGen system. Around the globe, thousands of buoys, sea-floor-mounted and floating platforms derive nominal power from solar cells, battery packs, and in extreme cases, diesel generators.  The severely limited available energy, which currently comes in unreliable intermittent bursts, means real-time status for sensitive communication systems is greatly compromised.The first OceanGen systems are targeted at weather buoys, oil and gas platforms, research platforms and military applications requiring 50-100 watts of power, although future systems will have applications ranging from naval C4ISR systems to marine navigation and sensor platforms.  Importantly, this technology can scale up to the kilowatt range, if required.The work will supplement ongoing development within both organizations. Battelle currently is a world-leader in sensors, materials, and anti-bio-fouling techniques. Levant Power is a leader in hydraulic energy harvesting and ocean-energy technologies and has been actively developing OceanGen for the last year. “The technical program will focus on reducing costs, extending service intervals, improving system efficiency, and leveraging Battelle’s expertise in designing for the ocean environment to make a long-term durable product,” said Clive Tucker, Levant Power Chief Design Engineer.About BattelleAs the world’s largest independent research and development organization, Battelle provides innovative solutions to the world’s most pressing needs through its four global businesses:  Laboratory Management, National Security, Energy Technology, and Health and Life Sciences.  It advances scientific discovery and application by conducting $6.5 billion in global R&D annually through contract research, laboratory management and technology commercialization.  Headquartered in Columbus, Ohio, Battelle oversees 22,000 employees in more than 130 locations worldwide, including seven national laboratories which Battelle manages or co-manages for the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and a nuclear energy lab in the United Kingdom.About Levant Power CorporationLevant Power is the world leader in suspension energy harvesting. The company is developing and commercializing breakthrough suspension energy recovery technology, GenShock®, and has demonstrated simultaneous semi-active ride control and on-board electrical generation. Founded out of MIT by a team of engineers in 2008, the company is growing rapidly and is now working with leading domestic and international manufacturers to tailor GenShock for defense, trucking, transit buses, rail, passenger vehicles, industrial and marine applications.[mappress]Source: Battelle, April 15, 2011 View post tag: Battelle Share this article Equipment & technology View post tag: Harvesters View post tag: Navycenter_img USA: Battelle, Levant Power Corporation Plan to Develop Ocean Power Harvesters View post tag: power View post tag: Levant View post tag: usa View post tag: plan View post tag: develop April 15, 2011 View post tag: oceanlast_img read more

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Alexandre Lacazette responds to Atletico Madrid transfer speculation

first_imgAlexandre Lacazette has been heavily linked with a move to Atletico Madrid (Picture: Getty)Arsenal striker Alexandre Lacazette has denied claims he’s spoken to Antoine Griezmann and Atletico Madrid ace Koke about a move to the Wanda Metropolitano.Reports in Spain over the weekend claimed Lacazette has been in contact with compatriot Griezmann to discuss life in the Spanish capital.Griezmann spent five years with Diego Simeone’s side before joining Barcelona and the Frenchman tried to convince Lacazette to join the club in 2017, before the La Liga giants were hit with a transfer ban.Lacazette has fallen out of favour under Mikel Arteta and the report claimed the striker had spoken to midfielder Koke about ‘conditions’ at the club and what life is like in Spain.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTHowever, the Frenchman has hit back at the speculation on Twitter. Replying to ‘Score Agency’, who represent the Frenchman, Lacazette said the reports were: ‘Not beautiful at all’.The striker followed that up with a series of ‘lying face’ emojis to further dismiss the speculation.His agency had said: ‘Twitter is magic. It’s not nice to lie to the fans of Atletico’.Though not completely dismissing the interest from Atletico, it’s clear that Lacazette wanted to dismiss reports that he’s actively seeking a move to the club. More: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man CityArteta is interested in Atletico midfielder Thomas Partey and reports claim the Ghanian has told friends he’s keen on a move to the Emirates.However, given the financial effects that the coronavirus pandemic is set to have on football, Arsenal are looking to offset a move for the midfielder by offloading one of their prized assets.Lacazette is one of those and given Atletico’s interest in the former Lyon man, it would make sense to include him in any deal for Partey. MORE: What Sir Alex Ferguson told his Manchester United squad after they lost Premier League title & FA Cup in six days Metro Sport ReporterMonday 4 May 2020 11:36 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link4.3kShares Comment Advertisementcenter_img Pas beau du tout !! 🤥🤥🤥🤥— Alexandre Lacazette (@LacazetteAlex) May 4, 2020 Alexandre Lacazette responds to Atletico Madrid transfer speculation Advertisementlast_img read more

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Joseph turns in strongest performance of year during Orange’s defeat of BC

first_imgCHESTNUT HILL, Mass. — Kaleb Joseph pounded his chest with ferocity while Dimitri Batten clapped his hands in frustration.As Joseph ran down the court off a steal on the fast break, a three-on-two Syracuse advantage had turned into a one-on-one with Batten. After Joseph got the first step, all Batten could do was get a hand up as Joseph finished his two-handed dunk with a shout as he ran back up the court.The dunk came with 5:32 left in the second half — a time at which Joseph’s often been on the bench this season.“That’s something I was lacking in some of the other games, I wasn’t playing with an edge,” Joseph said. “That’s something I was trying to get back to doing, just playing with an edge.”In front of two busloads of family and friends from his hometown of Nashua, New Hampshire, Joseph found his edge Wednesday night. He finished the best game of his Syracuse career with 14 points on 7-of-7 shooting from the field. He proved himself too important to take out down the stretch as Syracuse (16-8, 7-4, Atlantic Coast) pulled away in its 70-56 win over Boston College (9-14, 1-10) at Conte Forum.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSU head coach Jim Boeheim said Joseph took advantage of a defense that didn’t focus on him, and played aggressively when BC gave him opportunities.“Kaleb is the one guy that people have been kind of leaving open,” Boeheim said. “And he’s been hanging on the perimeter, so when he got the ball back he still had to go through somebody. He cut, made better cuts.”His offense in the first half came and went with a floater off the dribble just four minutes into the game. But he started to look for his shot more after the break. After pulling down an offensive rebound in the second half, he looked up to kick the ball out to the perimeter. But when he noticed he was open 7 feet from the basket, he calmly hit the short jumper.Forty-six seconds later, he pounced off the dribble and hit a fadeaway 10-footer with Patrick Heckmann hounding him with a hand in his face.The freshman point guard scored six of SU’s first eight points of the second half, and kept the Orange clinging to a tenuous lead that it never gave up.“I think the biggest thing is he’s playing more confident,” assistant coach Mike Hopkins said. “He had a couple nice penetration kicks for Mike Gbinije for a couple 3s. He got in the lane and the way teams are defending us, they’re going to let him have plays. You’ve got to step up and knock down shots, and he did.”With Rakeem Christmas getting doubled at every given opportunity, Joseph was given the chance to make plays. When BC’s Dennis Clifford and Olivier Hanlan covered Christmas at the top of the key, Joseph drove in for an open dunk with eight minutes to play.It was a theme of his night. When he got the chance to score, he did. When he got the chance to pass, he did that, too. Boeheim said he thought Joseph should have had more than four assists, but that his teammates either missed shots or put the ball on the floor when they got it from him.The head coach praised a player that he’s often benched for the important parts of the game. On Wednesday, he was at the forefront of a second-half run. He was the focal point of the offense when others weren’t. And he stepped up in a game played just 40 minutes from his home.“Whenever I do what I’m supposed to do,” Joseph said, “there’s no reason for me to come out of the game.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 11, 2015 at 10:58 pm Contact Sam: [email protected] | @SamBlum3last_img read more

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Google Android Head Says Not To Expect Any Major Products At I/O This Week

first_imgRelated Posts dan rowinski If you are waiting for a surprise bombshell of a product announcement at Google I/O in San Francisco this week, you may be disappointed.Speaking to Wired, Google’s new head of Android Sundar Pichai said of I/O, “It’s going to be different. It’s not a time when we have much in the way of launches of new products or a new operating system.”What does that mean exactly? Are we not going to get a new version of Android? A platform update to Chrome? A new Android Nexus tablet or smartphone? Events like Google I/O, Microsoft Build, Apple’s World Wide Developer Conference and similar events tend to follow a fairly simple script. The CEO will get on stage, do a little cheerleading and pump up the numbers of units sold, dollars made and developers paid. Then a variety of division chiefs will get on stage and announce new aspects to their products (like Andy Rubin talking about Android at previous I/Os). A few new products will then be introduced and hyped to get some buzz going. After the keynote, there will be about three days of sessions and meetings aimed at developers. Last year, Google followed this script almost perfectly. Until people started jumping from planes. Google went off-script in a huge way last year by introducing Glass, its augmented reality glasses that are currently the most-hyped item among the Technorati. Glass was introduced by Google co-founder Sergey Brin and a live demonstration of Glass-wearing stuntman jumping from a plane over San Francisco commenced. It was one of the strangest (and coolest) twists of a keynote presentation in recent memory. If we can take Pichai at his word, we are not going to see any of these pyrotechnics this week at Moscone West.“Both on Android and Chrome, we’re going to focus this I/O on all of the kinds of things we’re doing for developers, so that they can write better things. We will show how Google services are doing amazing things on top of these two platforms,” Pichai told Wired.So, we may not see any exciting new hardware at I/O this week. But we will definitely see a bunch of interesting developer news as Google rolls out tools to make Android richer, Chrome easier to build upon as well as features surrounding games, cloud and Google+. We will also likely see many, many mentions of Google Glass.We will be at I/O covering all things Google this week. What do you want to see from Google? Let us know in the comments.  Tags:#Android#Glass#Google IO13 Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

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Mobileye and Delphi show off driverless car tech at CES 2017

first_img5 Ways IoT can Help to Reduce Automatic Vehicle… Related Posts IT Trends of the Future That Are Worth Paying A… David Curry Break the Mold with Real-World Logistics AI and…center_img For Self-Driving Systems, Infrastructure and In… Mobileye and Delphi demonstrated its autonomous driving system at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2017 in Las Vegas on Tuesday.The 6.3-mile drive previewed some of the autonomous functions that will be integrated into the Centralized Sensing Location and Planning (CSLP) system. It worked inside a tunnel, in the urban sprawl of Las Vegas, and was able to merge on highways.See Also: Intel signs deal with Delphi to supply self-driving computing powerDelphi and Mobileye plan to license the autonomous system to automakers and other interested parties by 2019. The CES 2017 showcase is the first public display of the tech, which is being developed by both companies.“Delphi and Mobileye’s complementary skills are key to enabling a production-ready, scalable autonomous system,” said Professor Amnon Shashua, Mobileye co-founder, chairman and CTO. “These demonstrations provide a glimpse to what our collaboration has achieved so far while many of the truly advanced capabilities such as the full scope of REM and Reinforcement Learning for Driving Policy will be gradually upgraded during 2017.”Building a knowledgeable offline systemMobileye and Delphi want to build a system capable of working offline and knowing everything about its surroundings. It is building a localization and 3D mapping system that knows the vehicle’s location to 10cm, without GPS. The duo is also changing the behavior of the autonomous system to be more in line with how humans make decisions.Both companies have major stakes in the autonomous future, Mobileye is a key supplier of sensors, cameras, and Lidar, while Delphi already supplies thousands of parts to automakers. The self-driving partnership could keep both firms in the green as tech firms look to consolidate the automotive industry. Tags:#Autonomous car#CES2017#Delphi#driverless car#Mobileye#Self-Driving last_img read more

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Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems

first_imgThe answer, of course, is that it depends on the system. In principle, stable orbits should be possible for planets that are always much closer to one star than the other. But the devil is in the details — if scientists are going to spend valuable telescope time on binary stars, they need to know what they’re looking for. How close can two stars be to each other and still form planets? And even if planets form, can their orbits remain stable over billions of years? A small collaboration of scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center (Elisa Quintana, Jack Lissauer), University of Michigan (Fred Adams), and the Carnegie Institution of Washington (John Chambers) has taken steps to answer these questions. Modern telescopes can measure the orbital parameters of binary stars quite accurately, so it makes sense to first ask what kinds of star systems will preserve the innermost region of the protoplanetary disk. The simulations of Quintana and her colleagues are fairly straightforward. After choosing the masses and orbital parameters of the two stars, 140 planetesimals (mass = 1% Mearth) and planetary embryos (mass = 10% Mearth) are arranged around one of the stars so that their overall mass distribution resembles that of a protoplanetary disk. “The disk is modeled after the Solar nebula,” Quintana explains, “we’re comparing the planet formation process in these binaries to models of the Solar System.” In other words, they are trying to find out what our Solar system might have looked like if the Sun were a binary star.The simulation calculates the force of gravity between every pair of objects and adjusts their positions accordingly at one-week intervals. When two objects collide, if their speeds are not too high, they stick together into a body of greater mass. Eventually, the system forms a handful of stable, massive planets similar to the inner solar system.”Each simulation takes approximately 3 – 4 weeks.” Quintana tells PhysOrg.com. “This corresponds to 100 – 200 million years of simulated time.” Dr. Quintana goes on the explain that this is actually rather short, because many planetesimals are thrown out of the disk or into the central star as the simulation progresses. “The same disk of 154 bodies around the Sun, without any giant planets or a stellar companion [to eject particles], takes twice as long.” To explore a wide variety of possible binary star systems and obtain statistically significant results, Quintana and her colleagues performed over a hundred of these simulations — that’s several years of computer time! All of their simulations form at least one planet, an encouraging result. It turns out that the most important factor is the companion star’s periastron, or point of closest approach to the star with the disk. A companion that gets as close as the orbit of Saturn (about 10 times farther than the Earth from the Sun) removes very little material from the inner disk, and even speeds up the process of planet formation by nudging the planetesimals into different orbits from time to time. A companion star that gets as close as Jupiter (about 5 times farther than the Earth from the Sun), however, will limit planet formation to the hottest central regions.“Over half of the binaries [in astronomical surveys] are wide enough to allow planet formation in the habitable zone of solar-type stars.” Quintana concludes. That fraction expands the catalogue of interesting stars significantly, but many possibilities remain unexplored.For example, it is entirely possible for compact binary systems to share a protoplanetary disk; the planetesimals would just orbit both stars at once. And there is no reason for just one of the stars to have planets! Another open question in whether icy planetesimals, which normally form beyond 5 AU, can still reach the inner disk to deliver water to the rocky worlds. “It is more difficult,” Quintana admits, “but there are many scenarios for having habitable planets in binary star systems.” Most of the disk is not treated in these simulations, and there could be plenty of room around or between the two stars for comets and even gas giants to form. The water will probably still be available, but it is too soon to estimate how much of it might reach these worlds.Physical simulations of planet formation have the potential to answer these questions and more. By the time Kepler and CoRoT start detecting Earth-like worlds, this line of research should have given us a good idea what to expect.Citation: “Terrestrial Planet Formation Around Individual Stars Within Binary Star Systems” by Elisa Quintana, Fred Adams, Jack Lissauer, and John Chambers, Astrophysical Journal (in press) 2007. Available online at arXiv.orgBy Ben Mathiesen, Copyright 2007 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.Dr. Ben Mathiesen teaches physics at the American University of Paris. His agency Physical Science Editing helps scientists around the world achieve native English writing standards in their publications. Each circle in these plots represents a single simulated planet. The horizontal axis gives the radius of its orbit in astronomical units (AU; the Earth’s distance from the Sun), and the vertical axis gives the eccentricity of the orbit (zero is a perfect circle). The filled green circles represent our own rocky planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. The grey band indicates the solar system´s habitable zone. The lower plot shows planets from simulations where the point of closest approach between the stars is 10 AU (approximately equal to Saturn’s distance from the Sun). The inner disk has not been compromised; many planets form in and around the habitable zone. In the upper plot the companion star cuts this distance in half, and planet formation in the habitable zone is no longer likely. Scientific interest in the physics of planet formation is at an all-time high. Astronomers and physicists have reached a consensus on the underlying theory, or at least its outlines. A star is born from an immense cloud of gas and dust, which slowly contracts and heats up through the action of gravity. Some of the cloud falls towards the center, where it collects into a hot, dense ball of gas that will eventually become the star. The rest of the cloud orbits the center, contracting and flattening into a protoplanetary disk. Tiny grains of rock and ice stick to each other as they orbit within the disk, eventually growing into ‘planetesimals’ — small lumps of rock and ice similar to asteroids and comets. At this point gravity speeds up the process of planet formation considerably. Rocky planets form close to the newborn star, where the radiant heat prevents ice from forming. Icy planets form in the cold outer regions, but are much larger to begin with and quickly transform into gas giants. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The list of confirmed extrasolar planets keeps growing, and has now passed two hundred members — almost all of which are gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn. But the hunt is on for Earth-like worlds! With the successful launch of France’s CoRoT satellite (December 27, 2006) and the promise of NASA’s Kepler mission (due to be launched October 2008), the next five years should see the detection of numerous terrestrial planets around distant stars. But which stars should these telescopes be pointed at? Recent research has shown that these planets are probably quite common, and can even form in binary star systems. Explore further Citation: Terrestrial Planet Formation in Binary Star Systems (2007, January 26) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2007-01-terrestrial-planet-formation-binary-star.html Ploonets: Exiled moons may explain astronomical mysteries It is now thought that almost all stars are born with a protoplanetary disk — the question is under what circumstances these disks form useful planets rather than a mass of rubble. The method of choice is numerical simulations, which can follow the evolution of a disk by modeling its gas dynamics (in the early stages of planet formation) or the gravitational interactions between planetesimals (in the later stages). Such research has shown that planets should almost always form, at least around an isolated star like our Sun.Of course, star formation is a more complicated business.Stars rarely, if ever, form in isolation. More often, a giant molecular cloud will create dozens or hundreds of stars in relatively close proximity. Binary star systems, composed of two stars orbiting their mutual center of gravity, are actually just as common as singles. For stars the size of our Sun, about 50% form in binary systems.In the search for other worlds like our own, should we limit ourselves to stars like our own? Must we cut the field in half before we start looking? Might binary stars harbor Earth-like planets as well? last_img read more

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