10 months agoPSG keeper Buffon: Man Utd? They could buy new players – and change coach

first_imgPSG keeper Buffon: Man Utd? They could buy new players – and change coachby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the lovePSG goalkeeper Gigi Buffon says they cannot underestimate Champions League opponents Manchester United.The two teams will meet in the round of 16.Buffon said, “No, it’s not an easy draw. Some teams had a complicated draw, others did better. I saw that Juve inherited a difficult draw with Atlético de Madrid. Bayern Munich drew Liverpool. Then there is Barcelona again, Real Madrid. “This is an intermediate draw. We will have to be brave. We will have to have the same mentality as that shown in the last matches of the Champions League. But I will also add that the Champions League resumes only in February, in two months. There can be many things happening. They can change coach, players, there is a transfer window. “In my opinion, this is not the right time to analyse this team.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Read More →

Wisconsin’s Frank Kaminsky, Nigel Hayes and Duje Dukan Are Hanging With Local Elementary Students Today

first_imgFrank Kaminsky on the court against Duke.INDIANAPOLIS, IN – APRIL 06: Frank Kaminsky #44 of the Wisconsin Badgers reacts after falling to the court in the first half against the Duke Blue Devils during the NCAA Men’s Final Four National Championship at Lucas Oil Stadium on April 6, 2015 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)The No. 5 Wisconsin men’s basketball team last played at Michigan on Saturday and won’t take the court again until this Saturday at Iowa. With some extra free time this week, Badger big men Frank Kaminsky, Nigel Hayes and Duje Dukan are hanging out with the students at Glacier Edge Elementary School in nearby Verona, Wis. All three players spoke with the students as part of the school’s Kindness Week activities. The All-American Kaminsky even took a selfie with some students: #BadgersGiveBack #Notor #NigelHayesA photo posted by Frank Kaminsky (@fskpart3) on Jan 28, 2015 at 9:00am PST Dukan, who is 6-foot-10, tried to blend in with the crowd but it didn’t work out too well.New game: #WheresDuje? pic.twitter.com/GOY5bm3J8V— Wisconsin Basketball (@BadgerMBB) January 28, 2015 Hayes, meanwhile, may not have a future as a comedian judging off this joke, but he does know his state geography. Stand-up comedy with Nigel Hayes #BadgersGiveBackA video posted by Wisconsin Basketball (@badgermbb) on Jan 28, 2015 at 8:39am PSTOne underrated aspect of these photos and video is the impressive jersey game of some of the students at Glacier Edge. The local staples (Wisconsin and the Green Bay Packers) are of course represented, but shoutout to the kid in the sweet Dallas Mavericks throwback, and the two young men who wore the NFL jerseys of Badger alumni Russell Wilson and J.J. Watt.last_img read more

Read More →

Dear NFL Kickers Will Not Be Stopped

Did you hear about the NFL’s incredible new rule? On a point-after try, a defense will be able to score a 1-point safety by stopping the attempting team in its own end zone. Oh, and the new rule also moved the line of scrimmage for an extra point to the 15-yard line, making it the equivalent of a 33-yard field goal attempt.But indulge me for two seconds and let’s talk about this 1-point safety, a totally new thing in the NFL. Sure, it’s something that probably won’t come up very often – or, you know, ever. This new safety would occur if the offensive team fumbled the ball backwards, then the players kept knocking it backwards because of their gigantic butter-fingers until an offensive player finally recovered it in his own end zone (yes, on the other end of the field), where they were immediately tackled. (The offense can also score a 1-point safety, but that’s boring.) This opens up the tantalizing possibility of game scores traditionally reserved for baseball, soccer, or curling, like 6-1 (if the only points scored are a touchdown and a defensive point after safety) or 10-1 (if the only points scored are a touchdown, a defensive point-after safety, and two regular safeties).OK, thanks. Back to the longer extra point: The theory is that the league wants to make the play more exciting by making it less “automatic,” and perhaps by encouraging teams to go for two points more often. They’re unlikely to be very successful on either count.Kickers now convert extra points more than 99 percent of the time. That will almost certainly drop, but not by very much. It has been bandied about that kickers have made “only” 91.6 percent of attempts from this distance in the last 10 years. But 10 years is an eternity for kickers – they’re a whole lot better now than they were in 2005. As noted by Kevin Seifert, kickers have made 94.4 percent of field goals from this new distance over the last three years, and 96.7 percent last year. And that doesn’t account for the point-after kicks being slightly easier than their field goal counterparts: They’re never rushed for time, and they’re always taken from the center of the field (technically from wherever the kicker prefers). According to Pro Football Focus, kickers have made 97.6 percent of attempts taken from 30-35 yards from the dead-center of the field over the past three years.When I wrote about kickers in January I developed an era-sensitive model for kickers that at least partially accounts for hash marks (and, if I may, is scary accurate). It’s slightly more conservative than that Pro Football Focus mark, but predicts that kickers would make 96.4 percent of 33-yard kicks next year, rising to about 98 percent over the next 10 years.This isn’t the first time the NFL has been uncomfortable with how good kickers have gotten at their jobs. In 1974, the league moved the goal posts to the back of the end zone, effectively making XPs and other kicks 10 yards harder. Extra point success dropped from 98 percent the year before to 92.1 percent the year after. But it didn’t take long for kickers to recover:From an excitement standpoint, it’s tough to see a significant difference between teams making their extra points 96-98 percent of the time rather than 99. Even if misses happen slightly more often, they’re still going to be infrequent enough that I’d guess they’re more likely to annoy fans after the fact than keep them in suspense beforehand.And while this should marginally improve the math in favor of 2-point attempts, it’s not nearly dramatic enough to make going for two points the obviously better option. (It would have been if the NFL had also moved the line of scrimmage on 2-point attempts up to the 1-yard line, per the Eagles proposal.) Defenses will also be able to score two points on the play by returning a fumble, interception or blocked kick for a “touchdown,” as is the rule in college.And coaches are already pretty irrational about going for two. They have been converted about 47.4 percent of the time over the past 10 years, which would be enough to make them roughly the equivalent of kicking extra points (from an expected-value perspective; though that number may be low because teams that make 2-point attempts tend to be slightly worse than average). At the very least, the expected value of going for it versus kicking is so close that the decision should be dominated by the tactical situation (such as how far ahead or behind they are, and whether they should be playing it safe or trying to gamble) and how good the teams are in short yardage situations. But coaches still basically only make the 2-point attempt when they’re required to.If there is a big shift in favor of going for two, I think it’s more likely to be a result of coaches deciding the new rule gives them cover for it, rather than a large and fundamental shift in the math. And there’s precedent for this: The all-time high for successful 2-point attempts made was 59, set in 1994 – the year the play was first introduced. read more

Read More →

Losing An NCAA Tournament Game From Every Seed Isnt Easy But These

✓ Some early exits were more predictable than othersMen’s college basketball teams with at least eight losses in their opening games, including the First Four and round of 64, in the NCAA Tournament, 1985-2017 ✓✓✓✓ Source: sports-reference.com Arizona1155– ✓✓✓✓✓✓6 ✓✓ Missouri1050– Murray State100 Pennsylvania Utah State90 ✓✓✓✓ Valparaiso80 VCU 6 6 ✓ ✓ Louisiana State850– Temple933– ✓✓✓✓✓6 Arizona✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Vanderbilt Oklahoma956– La. State ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Missouri✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Xavier922– School12345678910111213141516Total ✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓ East Tenn. State80 8 ✓✓✓✓✓✓ Pennsylvania110 SchoolOpening-round lossesShare as better seed than opponent 6 Iona90 Iowa State✓✓ A few familiar Cinderellas have provided some of the greatest moments in the NCAA men’s basketball tournament. But every shocking upset from a ragtag mid-major also means something else: a big-name school has fallen on its face in spectacular fashion.And it seems certain big-name schools are more prone to this than others. In tournaments over the past 10 years, Georgetown has lost its opening-round game playing as a No. 3, No. 6 and No. 2 seed. Arizona won a title and made a second Final Four in the 1990s but also peppered that decade with four losses in the opening round — and in each, the Wildcats were seeded No. 5 or better.So are certain schools uniquely susceptible to March heartache? We looked back over every team’s opening-round game since the tourney expanded to 64 teams in 1985 — including the round of 64 and the play-in games known as the First Four.1The First Four got its start in 2011; play-in games between No. 16 seeds in earlier years were not included in this analysis. Some higher seeds do seem to head home early more than others — and a few of those well-known names are putting together an interesting range of losses.In the past 33 tournaments, 22 teams have made opening-round exits at least eight times.2We didn’t count round-of-64 losses that occurred after a team had won a play-in game. But most of those teams have typically been underdogs — teams that want to win, of course, but aren’t strictly supposed to. Brigham Young, for example, has lost its opening game 12 times, including once in the First Four, but never as a seed better than eighth.3The Cougars have lost as a No. 8 seed four times. Only eight of those 22 teams were seeded better than their opponent in half or more of their opening-round losses. One of those teams is Arizona, which has lost 11 times in the round of 64 and as the better seed in six of those games — most recently in 2016 as a No. 6 seed to a Wichita State team that had to win a play-in game just to be there. Missouri and Indiana have each lost 10 round-of-64 games, though only five of the Tigers’ losses came as the better seed, while the Hoosiers were the better seed in eight of their defeats. Georgia850– ✓ New Mexico ✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓ Murray State ✓✓✓✓✓ Lost when seeded … New Mexico State1118– Indiana Georgetown, however, doesn’t show up in our list of biggest opening-round losers, even though it suffered high-profile losses to Florida Gulf Coast in 2013 and Ohio in 2010. Indeed, the Hoyas have lost at the start of the tournament only two other times since 1985, as a No. 6 seed in 2011 and a No. 10 seed in 1997.But Georgetown does have something interesting in common with Arizona and Missouri, teams with high numbers of opening-round defeats. All three have lost an opening-round game as both a No. 2 and a No. 3 seed — a distinction they share with Duke, Iowa State, Michigan State and South Carolina.4Syracuse, which in 1991 became the first No. 2 to lose in the round of 64 when it fell to Richmond, is the only one of the eight teams to share that distinction that hasn’t also lost as a No. 3 seed.This got us thinking: If a team already has round-of-64 losses from two of the top three seeds, how many different seed lines could it lose from?In this day and age, it would be tough to suffer opening-round defeat from every spot on the bracket (especially considering that a No. 16 has yet to fell a No. 1). Major-conference teams are almost guaranteed a seed somewhere between 1 and 11, so they have plenty of opportunities to fail from those seed slots.5Unless a mediocre team manages to win its conference championship, à la the 2008 Georgia Bulldogs, which were seeded 14th because of their 17-16 record. And 14 through 16 seeds are almost always automatic qualifiers from smaller conferences that will have a hard time ever reaching the higher seeds without moving to a power conference or magically transforming into Gonzaga. So, a reasonable goal — if you could call it that — might be to lose from 12 different seeds, or three-fourths of those possible.It takes a special kind of program to have a diversified portfolio of early tournament losses. It has to be good enough to make the tournament often but not so good that it never loses its opener. So teams like Kansas are out: The Jayhawks have made the tournament every year but one since 19856The 1989 tourney. but have lost only two of their 32 round-of-64 matchups. (Duke is in a similar position, with only two opening-round losses other than its two highly seeded defeats.) The team also needs enough regular-season inconsistency from year to year to receive tourney bids from many different seeds — a program that’s good enough for a No. 4 seed one year but just the right amount of mediocre for a No. 10 seed the next.This merit badge of losing might not be possible; no team has reached even the three-fourths mark. These are the programs with opening-round losses from at least six different seeds: ✓✓✓ 6 6 Vanderbilt850– Nebraska ✓✓✓✓✓✓7 Davidson80 Providence ✓✓✓✓ 8 Brigham Young1331%– W. Virginia Texas875– ✓✓✓✓ Montana80 Utah State Marquette 6 Princeton Georgia 6 Princeton911– Schools that are consistently inconsistentMen’s college basketball teams that have lost in the NCAA Tournament’s First Four or round of 64 from the most seeds, 1985-2017 7 6 6 ✓ Indiana978– ✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓6 6 Source: Sports-Reference.com ✓✓ These teams are closest to running the table, but they all still have a long way to go. Iowa State has some of the hardest seeds out of the way — losing as a No. 27To Hampton in 2001. and No. 38To UAB in 2015. — but also handling the tricky 12 and 13 spots. To get to three-fourths of the seeds, all the Cyclones need to do is lose from those middle seeds of 4 through 7, 9 and 11. (For a long-suffering fan of the cardinal and gold, this feels like an attainable goal.)West Virginia is another team with a good range of losses, and unlike the Cyclones, the Mountaineers actually have a chance to add to their total this year. West Virginia is seeded fifth in the East region — a seed from which it has never lost in the round of 64. The 5-vs.-12 matchups are already ripe for upsets, as we know, so I’ll be picking Murray State to take down the Mountaineers and hand them a fresh seed loss. Like Iowa State and West Virginia, Murray State has six differently seeded opening-round losses, but one of those already came from the No. 12 seed, unfortunately. Penn also could have built on its total this year, but it’s already lost as a No. 16 seed. (And, of course, we’re hoping that the Quakers make another kind of history.)The teams on top of our loser’s bracket, Arizona and Missouri, have lost as eight different seeds, an impressive feat. Both teams have been responsible for several busted brackets, having fallen from the second, third and fourth seeds. We were hopeful that each team could add a notch to its belt this year, but the selection committee didn’t come through for us. Arizona is missing a No. 7 seed loss, but the Wildcats were too strong, securing the No. 4 seed in the South region. Missouri had more options in the middle, needing a No. 5 or a No. 7, but no such luck for the Tigers (well, really, for us) — they ended up with the No. 8 seed in the West.No team wants an early exit from the tournament. But if you’re going to lose your first game, it may as well be in a new and interesting way.Check out our latest March Madness predictions. read more

Read More →

Saturdays loss affects pride more than championship chances

The Badgers took down the top-ranked, undefeated Buckeyes in Madison, Wis. It’s happened twice since October in two sports. But let’s move on. Let’s move on from Badger fans allegedly spitting on Ohio State players, chanting homophobic slurs with Buckeyes on the free-throw line and screaming, “F— Ohio!” before the opening tip. The land’s best fans are above that. Let’s move on from the notion that somehow there’s a connection between Saturday’s loss and the Oct. 16 football game. Let’s move on because, unlike that football game, this team’s chances at a National Championship are the same now as they were on Friday. A loss in February does not break what could be a dream season in college basketball. Coach Thad Matta has continually emphasized that this team’s goal was never to go undefeated — it was to win the Big Ten Championship. The team had already moved on from an undefeated season before taking its first loss. Even with the defeat, OSU leads the conference by two games with six contests left. Four of those are at home, including the regular-season finale, a rematch against Wisconsin on March 6 in Columbus. At this point, it would take more than one loss to cost this team a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. But while Saturday’s defeat is relatively inconsequential in the big picture, it sure doesn’t feel that way, does it? Until the Buckeyes beat the Badgers, there are things that happened in the loss to Wisconsin that we can’t move on from. We can’t move on from watching a 15-point lead dissolve almost instantaneously, after a barrage of threes jet-fueled the bedlam at the Kohl Center.    We can’t move on from that unutterable feeling that churned the pits of our stomachs when we watched a guy named Mike Bruesewitz hit a game-deciding shot, when Wisconsin’s student body rushed the floor or when we couldn’t turn on the TV without seeing Jordan Taylor’s stat line that included 5-for-8 on 3-point shooting. We can’t move on from the fact that Wisconsin fans have started labeling the Badgers “Buckeye Killers.” The rate of winning that OSU has achieved in football and basketball makes losing to the same school over and over again that much worse. We wouldn’t be the fan base we are if these things didn’t bother us. It’s part of a good fan’s DNA to squirm when falling to a rival, regardless of whether the loss means anything. But the beautiful thing about sports is there’s always another opportunity. And the impact of Saturday’s result would shrink if the Buckeyes hammered the Badgers March 6 at home, like they should. “To be spit on is just nasty,” freshman forward Jared Sullinger tweeted following the game. “On top of that in my Face. Before and after the game. Smh. I just kept walking. More fuel to the fire.” Although it was tough, Sullinger did the right thing. Wisconsin will get what’s coming. Until then, let’s move on. read more

Read More →

Commentary Sundays game between Browns Bengals offers both teams a chance at

Despite their record, the Cleveland Browns (0-5) have played competitively in every game this year. Last week, they led the defending-champion New York Giants 14-0 before their prolific offense caught fire. Now they host the Cincinnati Bengals (3-2), who are coming off a disappointing loss at the hands of the Miami Dolphins. In that game, Cincinnati’s high-flying passing game was stifled by a defense that had been ranked 30th against the pass. Trailing by four points in the fourth quarter at home, the Bengals failed to generate offense when they needed it the most with their last two drives ending in a missed field goal and an interception to essentially end the game. Last week’s loss leaves room for questions. Are the Bengals the team that averaged 13 points per game in their two losses or the squad that kept opponents guessing on their way to scoring 33 points a game during a three-game win streak? One of their victims during that run was the Browns. But Cleveland’s secondary looks to prevent that sort of production this time around. In week two, when the Browns allowed Cincinnati quarterback Andy Dalton to throw for 318 yards, they were without a key component of their defensive backfield, shutdown cornerback Joe Haden. Now the third-year corner is back after serving a four-game suspension and will be assigned the task of blanketing Bengals receiver A.J. Green, who has 365 yards and three touchdowns receiving in his last three games. Should Haden be able to shake off the rust and take away Dalton’s favorite target, the Bengals may be exposed for their lack of go-to options on offense. After Green, there is a steep decline in the talent at the wide receiver position. Andrew Hawkins has done an admirable job in the short passing game and rookie Armon Binns has been relevant. But neither have shown the ability to carry the load. If Green is locked up, Dalton will need tight end Jermaine Gresham to step his game up and play like the Pro Bowler he is. Meanwhile, Cincinnati’s running game has not been reliable. Running back BenJarvus Green-Ellis is averaging just 3.3 yards per game and has already fumbled twice. Looking to get something going against the Dolphins, the Bengals turned to running back Bernard Scott. The career-backup showed signs of life with eight carries for 40 yards but sustained a knee injury and will be lost for the season. Cincinnati cannot afford another weak showing on offense against a Cleveland team that will be on the attack. While the Browns know they may not have the Bengals’ superior offensive personnel or chemistry the likes of the Dalton-to-Green connection, they are not intimidated by Cincinnati’s defense. In week two, rookie quarterback Brandon Weeden passing and rookie running back Trent Richardson each had their most productive games of the year. Weeden passed for 322 yards, two touchdowns and no interceptions while Richardson rushed for 109 yards and one touchdown on 19 carries. Playing at home with their pride on the line, Cleveland will give the Bengals a good fight, hoping a win will validate and encourage a young squad that is making progress but has nothing to show for it yet. Cincinnati, meanwhile, looks to prove that last week’s game was a fluke and that their offense can score with the best of them. Another strong showing in the passing game will silence their critics and prove the Bengals are a force to be reckoned with. read more

Read More →

Ohio State mens lacrosse sets lofty goals for 2013

The Ohio State men’s lacrosse team is heading into the 2013 season looking to shake off the sting of back-to-back losses in the Eastern College Athletic Conference Tournament semifinals in 2011 and 2012. Coach Nick Myers said his team’s growth in the off-season might be enough to make that hope a reality. “We’re a team that’s fighting and clawing to get better every day, I’m really happy with the effort we’ve put forth in practice,” Myers said. “I think right now the coaching staff is probably most thankful for the leadership that we’re getting and the way these guys are responding to the challenges that we’re putting in front of them.” The team can look for leadership in returning seniors Logan Schuss, Dominique Alexander and Kevin Mack, who will all join the Ohio Machine at the end of the season after being drafted in the 2013 Major League Lacrosse Collegiate Draft. Alexander, a midfielder and co-captain for the Buckeyes, said he’s excited to play for the Machine but won’t let his future distract him from his duties at OSU. “(Getting drafted) was pretty awesome, my family was pretty excited,” Alexander said. “Obviously my focus right now is the season, but it’s definitely something to look forward to.” In front of a sold-out crowd, the Buckeyes defeated Team Canada, 17-10, in its preseason opener on Jan. 20. And even though it’s early, some members of the team said their sights are already set on making it to the sport’s biggest stage. “I think the goal is definitely to get to the NCAA tournament, and once you get there anything can happen,” said junior goalie Greg Dutton. “I think we have the guys to do it, and I think we are a lot more mature than we have been in past years. We’ve got good senior leadership and we should have the expectation to make the tournament.” Like Dutton, Schuss has been named to the 2013 Preseason All-American team by Inside Lacrosse. The attacker was named last season’s ECAC Offensive Player of the Year, and Myers hopes for similar production this season. “I think Logan’s a guy that benefits off his teammates’ ability. He has incredible talent but he’ll be the first to tell you he’s as good as the five guys around him helping make plays,” Myers said. “I certainly think he is one of the best players in the country.” No. 20 OSU is set to play No. 12 Syracuse Saturday at 11:30 a.m. at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. read more

Read More →

For Sarah Miller Ohio State gymnastics is home

Ohio State gymnast Sarah Miller was named the Big Ten Events Specialist last week after being named Big Ten co-event specialist the previous week, continuing her soar on the scoreboards, but everything has not always been so easy for the talented athlete. After losing her mother at the age of 3, her grandparents at ages 13 and 14 and a coach as well, Miller managed to stay on track with gymnastics. Miller credits her successes and her tenacity to her late mother, who did mommy-and-me gymnastics classes when Miller was 2. “I think the main reason I stuck with gymnastics is because my mom got me into it and just kind of trying to make her proud in what she started me in,” Miller said. The junior Collegeville, Pa., native has found a safe haven in gymnastics. Every aspect of the sport has become a sense of comfort for Miller. “I know that if I didn’t have gym, I don’t know what I would do. It’s my home. It’s my stress reliever,” Miller said. “This is my family and these are my girls.” Melanie Shaffer, junior all-around gymnast and an acquaintance from Miller’s childhood turned friend, teammate and roommate, also provided a sense of comfort for Miller. “We became really close friends when we first got to Ohio State, but we met a little bit throughout club gymnastics because we are both from Pennsylvania,” Shaffer said. Although several of Miller’s teammates see her as the funny girl on the team, her coach said that Miller has a guard up. “She’s not super easy to get to know right away,” said Carey Fagan, OSU women’s gymnastics coach. “I think it takes a while for her to trust people and to let people into her inner circle because she’s lost a lot of people over time, and I think that has impacted her, and she takes her time getting to know people.” Fagan has also noticed that Miller has the tendency to be rather tough on herself. “She’s a perfectionist,” Fagan said. “She likes to go until she gets it right and I think that mentality over the years has taken a toll on her body.” Titled the Big Ten Freshman of the Year in 2011, she began to experience the pressures of a collegiate athlete. “Winning Big Ten Freshman of the Year, she has sort of emerged as the star of our team and she thrives (on) that,” Fagan said. “She loves being in that anchor spot in her events and she competes remarkably under pressure.” The expected dream of a collegiate gymnast is usually to make it to the Olympics, but that couldn’t be farther from the truth for Miller. “There’s always that (Olympic) dream when you’re a little kid, but after I started to come to realize, it’s not really what I want,” Miller said. “My dream is to be a collegiate coach.” OSU women’s gymnastics is set to next take on Michigan Friday at 7 p.m. at St. John Arena. read more

Read More →

Chelsea handed major Lewandowski boost

first_imgRoman Abramovich is more than hungry for a deal to bring in Lewandowski to Stamford Bridge, as they are still looking for a replacement for Alvaro Morata.Morata is still struggling to score a single goal since his last one on Boxing day, against Brighton. He was also left out of the Spain squad for their last game and according to Conte, he has to reach his top shape before the end of the season, or he will not be staying at Stamford Bridge for much longer.rb leipzig, bayern munichReport: Bayern are held by Leipzig George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Bayern Munich was held to another draw, this time by RB Leipzig.Bayern Munich finds themselves in the unfamiliar position of sitting third in the…Lewandowski has been lately linked with a move to Real Madrid. However, Florentino Perez might have already changed his target with Harry Kane, as they are also looking for replacement, only this time it is someone to step in Benzema’s boots, according to Express.Chelsea hopes have risen higher than ever as Perez is now eyeing Kane, instead of Lewandowski. It was his agent that sparked all the speculations for the future of the player last month.last_img read more

Read More →

Theo Walcott hopeful of England recall

first_imgEverton winger Theo Walcott insists that he still hopes of earning a recall into the England squadWalcott became the youngest player to represent the senior team at international level in May 2006 at the age of 17, when he came on as a second-half substitute in a 3-1 friendly win over Hungary.However, after making no appearances in the 2006 World Cup, Walcott’s international career has gradually declined over the years with the now 29-year-old having been omitted from the Euro 2016 and the 2018 World Cup teams.In fact, there has been no call-up for Walcott since 2016.But Walcott is hoping that his strong start at Everton this season, which has seen him score two goals in his three Premier League appearances, will change that.“My ambition is to play well for this club, and for this club to achieve what I believed they can when I joined it. And then if I play well, then who knows?” said Walcott, according to the Independent.Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“But yes, that’s obviously that’s one big thing for me to get back into the England squad,” The Independent quotes Walcott as saying.“I haven’t been in there for a couple of years now but yes, if I continue to play the right stuff I’ll hopefully get back in there.“But my goal isn’t to be thinking of England, my goal is to be playing well for Everton football club first, and then obviously we can cross that bridge when we come to it.“But yes, obviously you always want to play for your country. I’ve got 47 caps and I want that to be a lot more. So yes, I’ll continue to play well and we’ll see where that takes me.”Walcott has scored eight goals in 47 appearances for the Three Lions.last_img read more

Read More →