Beautiful Duo Jarrod Spector & Anika Larsen Are Taking Your Questions!

first_img Star Files Who is the next duo to take a seat on the comfy Broadway.com Ask a Star couch? Beautiful favorites Jarrod Spector and Anika Larsen! The talented twosome plays songwriting husband-and-wife pair Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil in the new musical, and they’re just as adorable offstage as they are at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre! Want proof? Ask them anything in the box below, then tune in to Broadway.com to see them answer your questions. Want to know Larsen’s most embarrassing audition story? What about Spector’s favorite gift from a Jersey Boys fan? Or have you ever wondered what Beautiful headliner Jessie Mueller is really like? Ask them now! <a data-cke-saved-href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/z12bcc8i0s4i7zf/" href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/z12bcc8i0s4i7zf/">Fill out my Wufoo form!</a> Jarrod Spector Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 27, 2019center_img Anika Larsen View Comments Beautiful: The Carole King Musicallast_img read more

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Syracuse to host Niagara, Patrick Beilein in December

first_imgSyracuse will host Niagara in the Carrier Dome on Saturday, December 28.The game marks the return to Syracuse of former Le Moyne head coach Patrick Beilein, the son of now-Cleveland Cavaliers head coach John Beilein. Before his departure, he led a Dolphins squad that reached the NCAA Division II men’s basketball tournament in three of his four years at the helm. His 2018 team reached the national quarterfinals, the furthest run in school history.The Orange haven’t played Niagara since 2000, when SU topped the Purple Eagles, 95-69. The matchup is the eighth game currently on Syracuse’s nonconference schedule.Here is SU’s schedule that has been released so far.Oct. 26 – Daemen College (Carrier Dome, exhibition)AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOct. 29 – Carleton College (Carrier Dome, exhibition)Nov. 6 – Virginia (Carrier Dome)Nov. 13 – Colgate (Carrier Dome)Nov. 20 – Cornell, 7 p.m. (Carrier Dome)Nov. 27 – NIT Season Tipoff vs. Ole Miss/Oklahoma State/Penn State (Barclays Center)Nov. 29  – NIT Season Tipoff (Barclays Center)Dec. 3 – Iowa (ACC-Big Ten Challenge, Carrier Dome)Dec. 14 – Georgetown (Capital One Arena)Dec. 18 – Oakland (Carrier Dome)Dec. 21 — North Florida (Carrier Dome)Dec. 28 — Niagara (Carrier Dome)ACC home games: Boston College, Pittsburgh, Notre Dame, Georgia Tech, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Duke, Wake Forest, North Carolina, North Carolina State.ACC away games: Boston College, Pittsburgh, Notre Dame, Georgia Tech, Virginia, Virginia Tech, Clemson, Florida State, Miami, Louisville. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on July 2, 2019 at 12:47 pm Contact Michael: mmcclear[email protected] | @MikeJMcClearylast_img read more

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Mallard’s Team of the Week — Whitewater BC Winter Games Ski Team

first_imgThe 2014 B.C. Winter Games are happening in Mission.Whitewater Ski Team will have representation at the Winter Games as four athletes are competing in the GS and Slalom Races. The Games are set for February 20-23.The Whitewater skiers are part of the 2000 athletes attending to compete in 18 sports from throughout BC.Mallard’s Source for sports would honour the skiers with Team of the Week accolades.The contingent includes, Kiley Waterfield, Oso Punchard, Liam Jones and Cheyanne Stevens.last_img read more

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First African American Billionaire, the Late Reginald Lewis, Remembered

first_imgThe late Reginald Lewis, the first African American billionaire in the United States, was a Harvard-trained lawyer and a businessman (image culled from Kolumnmagazine.com)Classmate, LRA Chairman Cllr. Robert Tubman, off the US for 25th Anniversary CommemorationBy William Q. Harmon and Alvin WorziThe board chairman of the Liberia Revenue Authority (LRA), Cllr. Robert Tubman, is expected to leave for the United States for a historic event in which many in the United States are anxiously waiting to participate. Cllr. Tubman leaves Liberia today to form part of the commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the death of an iconic African American, the late Reginald Lewis, the first African American billionaire in the United States.Lewis died in 1993 at age 50.By coincidence, for Robert Tubman, this man of honor was his schoolmate at the Harvard Law School. Lewis was a year ahead of the renowned Liberian Lawyer.Lewis, a self-made man from Baltimore, MD, was the first person to be admitted to Harvard Law School without ever applying. Lewis owned a law firm on Wall Street that became part of his multi-billion dollar business empire, Tubman said.Having already purchased the McCall Pattern Company for $22.5 million, Lewis made history for buying Beatrice International Foods for $985 million. At the time, it was the largest offshore leveraged buyout ever, according to a website dedicated to Lewis.According to Tubman, the celebration will be held in New York on Thursday, February 15. “This celebration is special because he is the first black man to earn a billion dollar through his company, T. L. C.,” Cllr. Tubman said. “This is a celebration of the financial community in the United States and of his life, which marked 25 years of his demise.”Cllr. Robert C. Tubman, a classmate of the late Lewis’s at Harvard Law School“We have people from around Africa that will be part of this wonderful celebration and I was invited from Liberia. There will be some people from Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Ghana and others,” Tubman said.According to him, the celebration is also being organized by the Harvard University and Lewis’s widow, as well as the television company that will be doing a documentary which will also broadcast from coast to coast in the United States,” he said.Cllr. Tubman indicated that Lewis was a dynamic man and a very gifted person, especially being a lawyer and a businessman who did a lot of things.He said in those days, there was no company that did extremely well to earn one billion United States dollars, and Lewis made a difference which is worth celebrating. Cllr. Tubman indicated that Lewis graduated from Harvard University in 1968, while he (Tubman) graduated in 1969. Mr. Lewis helped to empower many black people in the United States and other parts of the world, including Nigeria, Ghana, Singapore, Thailand, China, and the Philippines.This month, Cllr. Tubman said, showcases and celebrates the life of Mr. Lewis as an African-American, adding that this is the first time for Mr. Lewis to be celebrated.As chairman and CEO, he moved quickly to reposition his company, paid down his debt, and vastly increased the company’s worth, according to his biography. By 1992, the company had sales of over $1.6 billion annually, and Lewis was sharing his time between his company’s offices in New York and Paris.“For me, this was earth shaking in the sense that he was the first African-American, really the first American to do an overseas deal,” Loida Lewis said. “With racism part of [America’s] DNA, he was able to empower his community and Latinos.”While his legend is cemented in Baltimore through the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture, Lewis’ legacy reaches further.An exhibit in the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture features Lewis and there’s also the Reginald F. Lewis International Law Center at Harvard Law School; the Reginald F. Lewis High School of Business and Law; and the Lewis College of Sorsogon City in the Philippines.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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All I want for Christmas is some really juicy news

first_imgAll we want for Christmas is love everlasting, joy to the world and good will that springs eternal, right? That and a big heaping pile of heavily marketed baubles, toys, gizmos and designer duds truly capture the meaning of the season. But one can only imagine what would be on the Christmas/Hanukkah/Kwanzaa/nondescript agnostic/atheist wintry holiday lists of some of our favorite newsmakers. Here are my educated guesses – skillfully intermingled with a smattering of uneducated guesses: Saddam Hussein: All he wants for Christmas is a Frito Lay variety pack, the Fruit of the Loom value pack and for someone to actually believe his claim that he’s still president of Iraq. That’s why they call them Christmas “dreams.” Bashar Assad: All he wants for Christmas is to not be next on our list. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad: All he wants for Christmas is, er, all of Israel. The Iranian president’s naughty rating is so high that Santa has to start grading on a curve. Fidel Castro: All he wants for Christmas is immortality, an endless supply of stogies and more Jimmy Carters in the world. Oliver Stone: All he wants for Christmas is to be on Castro’s Christmas list. Kim Jong Il: All he wants for Christmas is a “Team America: World Police” sequel. Hans Blix: All he wants for Christmas is for his puppet to have a more successful rematch with Kim Jong Il in a “Team America” sequel. Jacques Chirac: All he wants for Christmas are some more genteel rioters next year. Have some cheese with that whine. Kazakhstan President Nursultan Nazarbayev: All he wants for Christmas is for comedian Ali G as Borat to stop making jokes about his country – and start picking on Uzbekistan instead. Viktor Yushchenko: All he doesn’t want for Christmas is another orange scarf. Alan Greenspan: All he wants for Christmas is 800 more years as Fed chairman. Or was that Yoda? Robert Blake: All he wants for Christmas is $30 million. He’ll take cash or check. Mohammed “Baghdad Bob” Saeed al-Sahaf: All he wants for Christmas is a new P.R. job. Michael Jackson: All he wants for Christmas is some good P.R. – and a big Bahrainian Neverland. Ted Kennedy: All he wants for Christmas is some cheer – enough to wipe from his memory the fact that he praised Sam Alito in his confirmation process for the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Samuel Alito: All he wants for Christmas – and New Year’s Day, and Eid, and Groundhog Day and Valentine’s Day – is for his damn confirmation hearings to kick into gear. Moammar Gadhafi: All he wants for Christmas are his WMDs back – biological, nuclear, doesn’t matter. However, he racked up so many years of being naughty that it will take at least 183 years to work his way out of the red and back up the “nice” list. Tom DeLay: All he wants for Christmas is Mark Geragos. (See? Republicans can make jokes about other Republicans.) Scooter Libby: All he wants for Christmas is to get off on the Valerie Plame charges and for commentators to stop harping on his dirty book – which, by the way, is called “The Apprentice,” is available on Amazon, and should come with optional plain brown wrapper. Kofi Annan: All he wants for Christmas are some barrels of oil – and in return, he’ll leave Santa a nice big plate of food. Bill Clinton: All he wants for Christmas is Kofi’s job. Pat Robertson: All he wants for Christmas are a few Venezuelan revolutionaries-for-hire. Hugo Chavez: All he wants for Christmas is a big Bolivarian wonderland that encompasses most of the Western Hemisphere. Vicente Fox: All he wants for Christmas is a chance to deck Chavez’s halls. Bridget Johnson writes for the Daily News. E-mail her at [email protected] AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Profitability on straddle trades

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Sometimes ideas for trades come from unlikely circumstances. While I was presenting a grain marketing seminar in February a farmer said he would never consider selling options because of the risk of large price movements. While I understand his fear, I don’t agree. Farmers’ fear of selling options can be due to many factors, including lack of education, complexities of the trades, and misunderstood risk exposure.I asked this farmer where he thought July corn would be on 6/22/18. He first said he had no idea, and I agreed, as I don’t know either. However, I asked him to take a guess. He said since corn was around $3.80 on that day, that it would be a reasonable estimate that corn would be around $3.90 in late June. I agreed, that would be my guess as well, based upon what we knew that day. I actually came up with the following trade on the spot to illustrate my point with the farmer in the presentation. However, after spending more time thinking about it, I thought it had potential in my marketing strategy as well. Following are the details of the trade: On 2/26/18 when July corn was $3.82Sell a $3.90 straddle (where I sell both the put and call for the same strike price)Buy a $3.60 putCollect a total of 28 cents premium for the tradeI then walked the farmer through all the possible outcomes of this trade.If corn is below $3.62 on 6/22/18, I don’t get to sell any corn and I could lose up to 2 cents MAX (Note: the $3.60 put purchase minimizes the downside risk in this trade)If corn is above $4.18 on 6/22/18, I have to sell 10% of my 2017 production for $3.90 plus the 28 cents from the sale of the options, so I would get $4.18 total.If corn is between $3.62 and $4.18, I will make some premium on this trade but no sale has to be made. The closer July corn is to $3.90, the more of the 28 cents premium I get to keep.Worst case scenario — prices fall below $3.62 and I lose 2 cents. I didn’t, and still don’t, think this is likely right now, but I’m comfortable with this scenario if it happens.Better scenario – corn prices are above $4.18. While I will have a price ceiling of $4.18 with this trade with a few of my bushels, I’ll be happy to get that price. Plus, if prices go this high or higher, I have more corn to sell and can still take advantage of that opportunity.Best case scenario — corn prices fall between $3.62-$4.18 and I pick up some premium. Like the farmer I met, I think it is most likely that corn prices will be around $3.90 in late June. If that happens I could pick up nearly 28 cents of premium on some of my bushels.I’m comfortable with all possible scenarios, so I placed the trade. Market action results – April option expiredAs always, I like to report back on how the trades I write about turn out. I like to be fully transparent, including the good and the bad, because there is always something to be learned in providing details of actual trades, rather than theoretical ideas or general market statements.Sold a call — ResultsOn 12/27/17 when May corn was $3.62. I sold an April $3.60 call for 10 cents against 10% production of my ’17 production.What does this mean?If corn is trading below the strike price when this option expires I keep the premium and add it to another trade down the road.If corn is trading above the strike price when this option expires I have to sell corn for the strike price PLUS the premium.I don’t really want to sell corn for $3.60 against May futures, but if it happens, I would actually get $3.70 with the 10-cent premium. Not ideal, but not terrible considering the price level trending at the time. Plus, I’ve made some premium selling other calls that I could apply to this trade to increase this sell price. What happened?Corn was above $3.70 on 3/23/18, so I sold 10% of my production at $3.70. Again, this is not an ideal trade, but I have enough premium captured from other trades up to this point that I’ll be able to pull this sale up to profitable levels. Since I never know for sure where the markets are going this is bound to happen from time to time. This is another reason why capturing added premium in the market whenever I can is so important for my marketing strategy. Straddle trade — resultsOn 12/26/17 when May corn was $3.62, I sold a straddle on 10% of my ’17 production:Sold April $3.55 straddle, where I sold both the $3.55 put and $3.55 call and collect an 18 cent premiumTrade Expires on 3/23/18Potential benefit: If May futures close at $3.55 on 3/23/18, I keep all of the 18-cent premiumPotential concern: Reduced or no premium if the market moves significantly in either directionOn every trade, I know, and am willing to accept every possible outcome. For every penny lower than $3.55 I get less premium until $3.37. At $3.37 or lower I will be losing money on this trade penny for penny. For every penny higher than $3.55 I get less premium until $3.73. At $3.73 or higher I have to make a corn sale at $3.55 against March futures, but I still get to keep the 18 cents so it’s like selling $3.73.I am most profitable on this trade if the market stays sideways at the end of March. If this happens, I would take the additional premium and add it to my “pot of premium” I’ve been collecting by selling options during the long-term sideways market. If the market rallies, I would have to sell some grain at higher levels than where prices were in December.If corn falls below $3.37 on 3/23/18, it isn’t as ideal. I would either buy back the straddle for a loss or remove a previous sale and take profits on the difference.What happened?This is a great example for why I always write down why I make trades. Time passes, and it’s not always easy to remember your mindset when placing trades without notes. In December most corn predictions were doom and gloom. Many thought the sideways market would continue until at least summer or possibly longer. I was trying to add premium, instead of waiting and hoping for rallies that might not come. Ultimately, the market outperformed where I thought it could go, which is a great thing for all of my ’17, ’18 and ’19 corn I still need to price.On 3/20/18, when May corn pulled back to $3.74, I bought back the $3.55 call portion of the straddle for 19 cents. I left the $3.55 sold puts to expire on 3/23/18. With the 18-cent premium from the original sale of straddle, I’m only down 1 cent before commissions. Since I let the sold $3.60 call trade above execute, and I’m bullish corn right now, I didn’t want another sale at the $3.70’s level to happen this month.Basically, this trade was almost a wash in the end (down 1 cent), but it had the potential for added premium if the market stayed sideways, which seemed very likely at the time and why the trade was originally placed. I’m fine with the outcome of this trade. Straddles have been making me quite a bit of premium up to this point. New straddle tradeWith one straddle coming off this week but not resulting in any additional sale I want to replace it with another one. This also allows me to offset the 1 cent loss of the previous straddle trade. Details are as follows:Sold – Sep $3.80 straddle (sold both the $3.80 put and $3.80 call)Bought – Sep $3.60 putCollected – 34 cent of premiumTrade Expiration – 8/24/18Potential Benefit – If Sep futures close at $3.80 on 8/24/18, I keep all of the 34 cent premium, less the 1 cent loss from above straddle trade. After all commissions from that straddle trade above and this new straddle, I can make potentially another 30 cents of premium.Potential Concern – Reduced or no premium if the market moves significantly in either directionOn every trade, I know, and am willing to accept every possible outcome. For every penny lower than $3.80 I get a penny less of my premium until $3.60. At $3.60 or lower I don’t sell anything, but I’m guaranteed at least 10 cents of premium, that I can apply to my pot of premium I have been collecting this year for the ’17 crop. For every penny higher than $3.80 I get a penny less of my premium until $4.10. At $4.10 or higher I have to make a corn sale at $3.80 against Sep futures, but I still get to keep the 30 cents so it’s like selling $4.10. Between $3.60 and $4, I’ll make a premium of 10 to 30 cents, but no additional sale has to be made.With the loss on the April straddle and replacing it with this Sep straddle I’m “kicking the can down the road.” I don’t want to sell corn near $3.70 against May futures. I want more upside potential because I believe the markets are in a different place than they were three months ago.This trade is most advantageous if the market remains steady or higher. Even if the market drops, I’m guaranteed to not lose any money from the options. The only negative with this trade is if the market drops in late August and I don’t take an opportunity beforehand to get more of my ’17 corn priced above a level equal to $3.73 against the May. New 2019 corn saleOn 3/13/18 when corn rallied, an order I had in place was hit and I sold my first 10% of production for 2019 at $4.18 against Dec ’19 futures. Am I missing out on rallies?Several farmers have wondered if all my straddle and sold call positions keep me from taking advantage of market rallies, like the most recent one I witnessed.As I always say, I’m fine missing out on a rally with some of my bushels because I always have more corn to sell. With the most recent unexpected rally, old crop corn futures rallied 30 cents over the last 90 days. With all of the options positions I had in place, I still collected about 15 cents of premium, or about half of the recent rally that most people, including me, didn’t expect would even happen.By including trades and options that are basically a bet against what I really want to happen in the market allows me to have a more balanced and controlled marketing plan. Waiting and hoping for a rally relies too heavily on luck and timing, which are impossible to predict long-term because there are too many variables.I prefer a marketing plan that has potential profit when the market trades sideways at unprofitable prices for any amount of time. I can still be ready to take advantage of rallies with future unpriced corn if opportunities become available. This strategy seems much safer and less risky to me than waiting for uncertain rallies to come. The sideways market of the past year is a great example that rallies are unpredictable and may take a long time to develop. My marketing strategy isn’t to hit the top of every rally, which is impossible to do, but keep my farm operation profitable year after year.*** It should be noted that I choose to reown the straddle trade instead of the call trade. I could have chosen either trade to buy back and replace with the Sep straddle. The end result of my trade values should be equal with either trade because the straddle would have earned me a $3.73 sale instead of the call that only earned me a $3.70 sale. The losses would have been 3 cents more on the buyback of the call but the futures sale with the options premium collected would have offset this loss *** Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

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Heavy rain alert in Odisha

first_imgThe Odisha government has put all Collectors on high alert as almost all districts are likely to receive heavy rain under the influence of a low pressure area brewing over Bay of Bengal during the next five days.An orange warning has been issued for six southern districts — Malkangiri, Koraput, Nawarangpur, Kalahandi, Gajapati and Rayagada — from September 2 to 3 during which heavy to very heavy rain is likely to occur.Thirteen more districts — Kandhamal, Puri, Ganjam, Nayagarh, Khordha, Cuttack, Dhenkanal, Jagatsinghpur, Angul, Deogarh, Keonjhar, Sambalpur and Mayubhanj — have been issued with yellow warning for the same period.“Collectors of the districts under orange warning are directed to keep the administrative machinery fully prepared to meet any possible flood or waterlogging situation,” said Special Relief Commissioner Bishnupada Sethi in his message.The government says rain would start in seven southern districts from Sunday and another 11 districts would receive heavy rain in later half of the day.The SRC directed that advance arrangements be made to evacuate people to safe shelters, if required, and to provide adequate food, safe drinking water, lighting, health and sanitation facilities at the shelters.last_img read more

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